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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,
I just got new front and rear brakes, with new discs on the front and repair to both rear drums. Now, I'm in need of new front ball joints (both sides) as well as front control arm bushings.. While this is done, I figured I would go ahead and get new shocks all the way around.. The thing is (and Ive priced around), the mechanics around here are charging out the arse on parts alone, not to mention labor.. So, I would like to save a few hundred by buying my own parts.. I want mid grade suspension- a step or two up from factory.. Also, I'd like to spend around $400 give or take on parts.. So, my question is, what all do I need for the job to be finished? I know I obviously need ball joints, but for the bushings, do I need the "kit", upper, lower to frame, or both upper and lower? Then, would the Monroe Sensa-Tracs (the $34 ones on racepages) be what Im looking for in the way of shocks? Lastly, I'm assuming I should get the adapters for the Monroes, but is it not needed for the rear? I only see "front right, front left, or just front". Thanks so much for the help thus far! I'm planning on becoming a member very soon.
 

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my advice when it comes to front end work is to do it all at once so you only have to get an alignment once.

so you'll need upper and lower control arms, shocks, inner and outter tie rods, strut rod bushings, upper and lower spring isolators, maybe cam bolts (if yours are rusted in there), sway bar end links, and the bellows (i think thats what it is called) that goes over the tie rod.

doing all the work yourself will save you a boatload of money and its pretty easy to do yourself with some hand tools. only thing you would need a shop for it to swap out the springs.

hope this helps ya out.

oh, the control arms come with new bushings installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If I can do it on my own, that would be great.. I dont have access to any power tools or anything though. Which manual would be the best for this type work?
 

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i think most people get a haynes manual, and 99% of the work can be done with hand tools. (although power tools sure are nice!)
 

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FordFanatic said:
i think most people get a haynes manual, and 99% of the work can be done with hand tools. (although power tools sure are nice!)
I like the Haynes better than Chilton. I did my rebuild without any power tools. Just make sure you start spraying everything down with PB blaster (or equivalent penatrating oil) everyday for a few days before you do the tear-down. Also:

Bangster said:
If you have a fast internet connection and the ability to burn your own CD, www.fordcds.com has the same thing, cheaper and faster (free and the time it takes to download it and burn it).

I personally like the Ford Service CDs, only some times do I find myself refering to All Data or a paper Chiltons or whatever other paper manual I have.
The Haynes will have short-cuts you can use without all the "special tools" the service CD will recommend. But the CD will have pics and better trouble-shooting and a wiring diagram. The 2 together, along with this site, should have all the info you need for this and anything else you want to tackle in the future.

Rob
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bangster
If you have a fast internet connection and the ability to burn your own CD, www.fordcds.com has the same thing, cheaper and faster (free and the time it takes to download it and burn it).


They offer various formats. Which is best?
 

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Only because no one has suggested it :)

You may want to check out rock auto as the parts supplier, their prices are reasonable. That is where I bought my moog upper arms.
 
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