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Unobtainium as far as know. :(

Some of the junkyard junkies here might have a few stashed away.

Joe
 

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You can re-use the old ones, but obviously it requires a disassembly of the old shock.

Al
 

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I had to get those from a junkyard; they still think I'm insane. :)

The proper way to remove those is to remove the shock, and use tools to compress the spring, and remove the center nut.

I would not do this, but You CAN stand on the fender, with your feet off the ground, and take the top nut off; it's pretty spectacular. Don't try this at home, kids! :)

The more stuff that is still attached to the spindle, the less it flies thru the air... :)
 

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If the car is on the ground you can take the shock nuts right off without anything scary happening. I’ve done what Grog describes though, but I climbed into the engine compartment, no extremities were in the path of the spring. It’s less scary than you’d think when it gives way though, the spring is doesn’t have much energy left in it at full droop, it’s way safer than those rinky dink parts store compressor tools as far as I’m concerned.
 

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Not to go off topic but is there a spring compressor sold that works well for our cars? I did the fronts on my tbird with the parts store rental ones and it was super sketchy. Not doing that again.

I need to do my Cougars soon and would like to do it myself if possible. I have seen some "claw" style spring compressors, also hydraulic ones for $150ish on amazon. They have mixed reviews though.
 

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Not to go off topic but is there a spring compressor sold that works well for our cars? I did the fronts on my tbird with the parts store rental ones and it was super sketchy. Not doing that again.

I need to do my Cougars soon and would like to do it myself if possible. I have seen some "claw" style spring compressors, also hydraulic ones for $150ish on amazon. They have mixed reviews though.


https://www.amazon.com/Branick-7600-Strut-Spring-Compressor/dp/B00MMLG9ZU

If it doesn't bolt to a wall, it's pretty sketchy with these springs.

I have the heavy duty clamp type ones, and doing sport springs with those was the scariest thing I've done; they looked like a banana before they would compress enough.

They work fine on the contour, lol.

This is one job to take to someone, or use the "whole weight of the car" trick mentioned above.
A 250lb friend putting his weight on one corner will loosen that right up. :)

One of the ones I took loose didn't have the spindle attached, and I didn't notice; we didn't find that lower, lol.

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You don't need compressors for the rear; take the knuckle loose and tie it up to something, drop the straight arm down, and the spring will pull out.

You don't really need to dink with the rear suspension at ALL, if all you're doing is replacing the rear shocks; as long as you leave the weight of the car on the wheels, you can just unbolt the shocks, and replace them.

The only pressure on them is the gas pressure, and 20 yo shocks don't have that, lol.
 

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Since we're on the topic of spring compressors, I have some questions.

Obviously, the best and safest one to use is a unit that is wall mounted.

Sketchy is something that is part of the rent-a-tool program at the parts store. But it seems there's varying degrees of sketchy on this.

What is the least sketchy spring compressor to use on our cars? Are all non-wall mount spring compressors equally sketchy to use on all cars, or just ours? For example, can I use a rent-a-tool spring compressor from the parts store on my mom's 2006 Sentra and not really worry about anything? Or should I take it in to a shop that has a wall mount spring compressor anyway?
 

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I bought one of these sets:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000CMDPLM/ref=psdc_15709001_t2_B00IDHUQWY


Do NOT use these for sport springs unless you're suicidal.

I sat in a chair with it carefully positioned in my lap, so the shattering steel bolt fragments were all I had to worry about if it let go, and not the shock fragments; holes in the walls are relatively easy to fix.

They work fine for small cars, but not these.

I use the fender method; I weigh about 250, and it's not hard.
 

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Since we're on the topic of spring compressors, I have some questions.

Obviously, the best and safest one to use is a unit that is wall mounted.

Sketchy is something that is part of the rent-a-tool program at the parts store. But it seems there's varying degrees of sketchy on this.

What is the least sketchy spring compressor to use on our cars?
Check out my Amazon link in post #8. I would use that on any spring, I watched Rob use one just like it, and with an impact gun compressed the spring in 5 seconds (though they don't recommend using an impact gun!). That shaft is like 2" dia.

Advance Auto has the one like Grog's on the loaner tool program, and that was the reason I aborted the job and took it to a mechanic. I have had a similar clamp spin around the spring in a split second, luckily our fingers were out of the way.

Al
 

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I have this: https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-62300-MacPherson-Strut-Tool/dp/B000COA1F8/ref=sr_1_5?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1533936553&sr=1-5&keywords=lisle+spring+compressor

I've used it many times and I've never had a problem. It's a very heavy duty set and it bolts the compressors to the springs. It would have to fail catastrophically for it to cause a problem. It won't fail because the spring "slipped out".
I like that much more, the U bolts are smart. The more common types shear off or bend
 

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I bought one of these sets:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000CMDPLM/ref=psdc_15709001_t2_B00IDHUQWY


Do NOT use these for sport springs unless you're suicidal.

I sat in a chair with it carefully positioned in my lap, so the shattering steel bolt fragments were all I had to worry about if it let go, and not the shock fragments; holes in the walls are relatively easy to fix.

They work fine for small cars, but not these.

I use the fender method; I weigh about 250, and it's not hard.
So if I were to get one of these and use on my mom's Sentra (I'm replacing her struts this weekend) that would be fine. Or even perhaps for my lowered Honda, would it be fine?

Check out my Amazon link in post #8. I would use that on any spring, I watched Rob use one just like it, and with an impact gun compressed the spring in 5 seconds (though they don't recommend using an impact gun!). That shaft is like 2" dia.
I saw it, and I kind of liked it too.

I have this: https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-62300-MacPherson-Strut-Tool/dp/B000COA1F8/ref=sr_1_5?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1533936553&sr=1-5&keywords=lisle+spring+compressor

I've used it many times and I've never had a problem. It's a very heavy duty set and it bolts the compressors to the springs. It would have to fail catastrophically for it to cause a problem. It won't fail because the spring "slipped out".
Would these work on Vogtlands for our cars as well? Or do those require more heavy duty stuff? IE, wall mount?

I've used a unit like this: Link: http://a.co/ierzaUL
Borrowed it from a friends shop. Worked great.
I like that one! Would that work for Vogtlands on our cars?
 

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I've used them on my Sprint springs which are linear rate (heavier than Vogtlands) springs. I've never had a problem with them.
** clicks ' add to cart' button **

Those will pay for themselves on the first use alone :).
 

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The shear force on those steel ubolts is fine with our springs; and those tighten on the coil itself, so they won't slide suddenly, and eject the spring, like the ones I have can do.

Mine have safety clips, but the sport springs are ~500+lbs/in compression, and you have to go about 4" on the front one to get it to release.

That's a Ton of pressure, Wanting to Dissassemble! I wonder if I could cut a shock shaft with thermite fast enough for it to fly? Hmmmm.

Yes, the steel the ones I have are probably good for 180klbs/sqin, but it's threaded (-20%), it's pulling at an offset angle (-5-20%), and it deforms into a stress curve, which concentrates stress towards the middle (-5-100%). :D (That last one, if it bends to the level of "Column Buckling", it fails instantly, and hardened metal sprays metal shards like a grenade when it shatters. :) I know way too much about breaking **** to be really happy, but I'm fatalistic enough not to worry about it a lot, lol. )

You Honda's sport springs are unlikely to be over 300lbs, and the Contour ones didn't bend anything at all.


Like I say, the rear ones don't really need a compressor, you remove the two lower knuckle bolts, support the knuckle, loosen the two inner lowers, loosen the lower shock bolt and support the arm with a jack, and remove the lower shock bolt; the LCA can be lowered to straight down, and you grab the spring and pull, as it's only stuck on the cast in perch.

:)
 
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