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Discussion Starter #1
So here's the deal. I was a good boy in school and did my work and got good grades. I went to college and enrolled in difficult programs and worked hard to get a good education. In the past several years I've developed my skills well and am pretty good at what I do (software engineer).

Now I can't find a job because I don't have XYZ-buzzword-acronym on my resume. Companies won't even give me the time of day despite my ability to do a good job and my past history.

So what I'm asking is... what's the trick to finding a job? Right now I'm just posting my resume on the job boards (monster, dice, etc.) and am at the whims of anyone who picks up on it. This hasn't been a successful strategy.

What do you folks think?

John
 

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You need experience of course.

I'm a PC Network guy. Right now I'm in buffalo working a god awful tech/network job for diddly squat wages.

I've been at it a year.

When I move south, that 1 year experience, plus the degree, really helps out and looks good.

Also get your CERTS. You need to prove that you know your stuff, and an industry standard will verify that for you.

So far I have the A+ and am studying for the microsoft tests.

Keep at it!

Also you need to submit your resume to employers, not just post it.

The only crap i get from my monster resume being up there is spam for me to be a talent scout, and other bs jobs.
 

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its a PITA I have years of banking and management experience and I am working with the developmentally disabled here in NY since I cant find diddly in the poconos area of PA

I also update my resume often on those career websites and pick words from jobs I have been in before when I redo my resume
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I have seven years software experience with a major defense company. I come with an active clearance (which costs a ton of money these days). I really feel that, with the right group, I can write any kind of software application you can imagine. I have professional references that can back up my work ethic.

But since I don't have experience with the flavor-of-the-month, I'm an unqualified software engineer. Then we have to hear companies whine about how there aren't any good candidates. I really am about one step away from walking away from this career altogether. There is so much BS involved in the industry that it's just not worth it. If I had another career in mind I would probably go for it.

Basically, like my buddy here, if I want a job I have to go to NYC. The cost-of-living up there is so ridiculous that it's not even worth it. I'm not in some sticks section of Jersey either; I'm right outside of Philly.

The other thing that peeves me is that companies don't even post most of their openings. They expect to get referrals from inside employees and the like. An "outsider" can barely get past HR.

I guess I'm just frustrated. I've been actively looking for a job for a year now and have come up with essentially bupkis. I've only been unemployed for two months -- and yes, those were the end-of-the-year-we-don't-hire months -- but it seems like it's been forever. I guess I just need to be more patient and keep looking.

John
 

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Hard to believe that with a BS degree in Software Engineering, experience, and a clearance you can't get a job. Are you willing to relocate? There are web sites that specialize in clearance jobs. Network with former coworkers and check defense contractor web sites. Find a job you like and apply for it. Not sure how good just posting a resume at a site will do. I posted for hundreds of jobs and had to relocate before I got a job after beiing laid off in 2003. Ended up with a Systems Engineering job after 26 years of Software Engineering.
 

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JustinH said:
You need experience of course.

I'm a PC Network guy. Right now I'm in buffalo working a god awful tech/network job for diddly squat wages.

I've been at it a year.

When I move south, that 1 year experience, plus the degree, really helps out and looks good.

Also get your CERTS. You need to prove that you know your stuff, and an industry standard will verify that for you.

So far I have the A+ and am studying for the microsoft tests.

Keep at it!

Also you need to submit your resume to employers, not just post it.

The only crap i get from my monster resume being up there is spam for me to be a talent scout, and other bs jobs.
Where are you planning on moving Justin?!?!

Israel
 

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I'd move away from there. Get into the smaller towns/cities and they treat you like a god. You know how much experience I have with computers? Just normal screwing around. But I went to a hick college and was a work study, and got the above and beyond award for my work. However, after seeing everyone else go up there and get multiple awards, and I only got that one, it kinda felt crappy. But when you have a better knowledge than everyone else in that field, you look better. Plus, there were a couple times I fell asleep for a couple minutes at the computer, right in front of my boss. I only worked 10 hour weeks too. It sucked, but if I would've stayed in that area, I was almost guaranteed a job there since the secretary had left.

I guess what I'm trying to say is, you need better networking skills. It's not always what you know, it's who you know, and even better if it's both. Get people saying, "This is a good kid. You need to hire him at your company." Meet people, show them your work ethics, let them understand what kind of person your are. I got a job after a month doing appliance installation for $9.50/hour plus benefits and ESOP. If nothing else, I was going to see about getting a job using the fact that my aunt is a middle school principal and president of Montana Outdoor Science School, my uncle works at MSU, and my cousin is going to be an assistant vice president of a local bank here. I'm not better than that, I needed a job. But I was able to get the job just off of my resume, I think.
 

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Have you tried Tyco, in Harrisburg, PA ?

Thats where their IT dept. is.

A co-worker (program analyst) just got offered a job there.






.
 

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Check out the listings on my company's website

www.citrix.com

If you see something there you are interested in apply online and shoot me an email with your resume and the job number you posted for.
 

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88pimpin said:
I'd move away from there. Get into the smaller towns/cities and they treat you like a god.......
I agree, get out of the area. Besides making you more in demand, the people are friendlier and the living expenses are smaller. I don't know where you're willling to move to, but I know that the State of KS is looking for Programmers right now. And Topeka isn't a bad place actually. (Or any of the cities in KS.) For example:

http://www.da.ks.gov/ps/pub/reqinfo.asp?id=154574

Taken from:

http://www.da.ks.gov/ps/pub/reqinfo.asp?id=154574

Anyway, its a thought. And good luck no matter what you decide.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I know I need to keep my chin-up and I feel really beat-down. Re-locating might be necessary but I'm resisting with all my might at this time since I don't want to be too far away from family and selling the home at this time isn't my greatest move. I might have to do it though. There are places in Jersey that have a ton of jobs but the cost-of-living is just ridiculous, and the pay doesn't make up for it.

It's odd that CNN/Money named this career #1 in America. Virtually all of my friends are very disguntled with their situations also and want "out" in some form or another. I thought I might be happy dipping into contracting instead of the full-time work but it doesn't seem that there are many contracting opportunities open anymore. I guess most of the work in this area is defense and maybe they've cut back a bit.

Maybe now that the new year has started hiring will pick up some.

Thanks for the ideas guys!

John
 

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I was told after the new year people get theier bonuses so there are more jobs available ... I've found its tough in jersey and PA to find a job unless you are close to philly or NYC which sucks

unless you want a crazy commute...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
doodaa said:
http://careers.csc.com/index.shtml

http://careers.csc.com/careersource/CSCPVS2.NSF/ByLocation?OpenView&Start=1&Count=60&Expand=15.27.8#15.27.8

They used to have a good sized operation there in Mt. Laurel or Cherry Hill..... on Marlton Pike I think.
Yeah I've tried for contracting positions at both of those sites but they didn't bite. But they did want me to apply for full-time employment and I guess I'll do that as a last resort. The jobs would be very similar to the one I just left (same project of sorts) and the company operates pretty much the same way my previous one did. And I left that job for a reason. Not something to smile over, but when you're desperate, it doesn't seem so bad. ;)

John
 

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Discussion Starter #18
One of the problems is that being a good software engineer isn't sufficient. You have to have x years experience in [name this particular technology]. Now it's impossible to know everything of course, but can't they go out on a limb and take a chance on somebody who is good at software but maybe doesn't know every technology? Do they think that we're so stupid that we can't pick up this stuff rather quickly? For instance, I consider myself pretty much an expert at Java. I'm not a god, but I've worked with it for 7 years and learned it in college to boot. But since I don't have any working experience with J2EE or JSP or servlets or whatever, I'm not a good candidate. I mean jeeez... cut us some slack. It's not hard to pick up and isn't it more important to find a candidate that works well, knows his field, and gets along great with the team?

It's time to open a landscaping business, guys... who's in? :D

John
 

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I know what you mean about Java. My last 5 years were Java and there is so much that you can't know everything. I think companies make a mistake when they are asking for so much for specifics. In my 26 yrs I learned new technology on every job. Assembler, Fortran, Ada, C, C++, and Java. Not that big of a deal for a good engineer to learn something different.
Be careful on the contracting gigs. If you do not have health insurance through some other means like a spouse it could kill you. My last job was a consultant and my health insurance surpassed my house payment (went up about 30% a year until it was over 1k a month). You also figure as a direct you work 11 months vs 12 months as a contractor. Most places give directs 2 wks vacation, 2 wks of sick and 2 wks of holidays.
Hang in there as this was the #1 growth projected career. Relocating is not that bad especially if they give you assistance. My new company picked up my movers bill and gave me about 10% on the sell and 5% on the buy.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Dusty,

Let me just get this straight since I didn't believe you the first time... You've been doing software for... 26 years??? And you're still alive??? Have you developed any kind of permanent disability? Schizophrenia...? Tourettes, maybe? Are you one step away from the funny farm? I'll never believe that you have any hair left, even if you post pictures.

I'm really surprised because you come across as a very normal human being. I don't know anybody who's been able to do that.

John
 
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