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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
any ideas on how to make this easy? I been wresting with it for like... 2 hours?
I got the nut out, the bolt half way out... and not its stuck.. i tried lowering the LCA and raising it, nothing. stuck.
Im going to try to put a jack under the strut where the bolt is stuck to maybe relief pressure, think that will work?

PS.
Reason im posting this and not trying is because my day off happened to be today and the weather is 32 degrees or lower, so my POS hydraulic jacks(all 3 of them) decide to quit on me, they and sitting in my living room warming up :-D

PPS. (EDIT)
IT worked, kinda, sledge hammer helped.. other then that, everything was smooooooth and the other side it was even faster! no more clunks... for now.
 

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Those bolts are a REAL PITA to remove, especially if they've been in there many years! If it has, it's most likely seized. I had new front shocks put on my '97 T-Bird last year at a shop (because I couldn't get those bolts out!), then had to replace the passenger-side shock a couple of months later when I was completely rebuilding my front-suspension because the top of the shock piston rod broke when I was holding it with a wrench to keep it from turning while I loosened the nut (the nut somehow started to cross-thread and was getting hard to turn). I removed the shock and lower control arm as a unit and STILL had a hard-as-hell time getting that bolt out, even though it had only been in there about 2 months and was brand-new from the Ford dealer when the shop installed the shocks (and there wasn't even any kind off pressure from the shock pushing on the bolt, since I removed both the shock and LCA as a unit)!

I found it helps a bit to put a socket and wrench on the bolt head and try turning it back and forth as your trying to pound it out with a BIG-ASS hammer!

Good luck!

Dennis
 

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Those bolts are a REAL PITA to remove, especially if they've been in there many years! If it has, it's most likely seized. I had new front shocks put on my '97 T-Bird last year at a shop (because I couldn't get those bolts out!), then had to replace the passenger-side shock a couple of months later when I was completely rebuilding my front-suspension because the top of the shock piston rod broke when I was holding it with a wrench to keep it from turning while I loosened the nut (the nut somehow started to cross-thread and was getting hard to turn). I removed the shock and lower control arm as a unit and STILL had a hard-as-hell time getting that bolt out, even though it had only been in there about 2 months and was brand-new from the Ford dealer when the shop installed the shocks (and there wasn't even any kind off pressure from the shock pushing on the bolt, since I removed both the shock and LCA as a unit)!

I found it helps a bit to put a socket and wrench on the bolt head and try turning it back and forth as your trying to pound it out with a BIG-ASS hammer!

Good luck!

Dennis
I would never do this job without air tools now. Ideally an impact on one side of the bolt and an air hammer point chisel banging on the nut side with the nut partially in.

There are many other tricks like wedging a small screwdriver in the metal bushing split to get some penetrating oil in there.

Whatever you do, unless you are going to sell it to your worst enemy, wire brush off some of the rust and put copious amounts of anti-sieze in the sleeve and bolt body. Use a tool to coat the inside of the sleeve. I never reassemble any metal to metal on a vehicle without this stuff. I got a big jar of it for under $10. Same goes for brake rotors (thin coat), wheels, etc. If I put a new shiny metal hose I rub the stuff into it. I even put it on the exterior starter brush lead, I had one rust out completely on me. After years it is as good as new, on another car without it it is starting to corrode.
 
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