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Hey Guys and Gals. For those who don't have me on Facebook, so don't know what is going on. Here is the skinny.

I am now retired, remaining in Japan for the time being. I am currently employed onbase and now residing off base in a nice Japanese house. Soon, I am going to have my residency card. think of that, If I can get a residency card in Japan, how come certain people can not do it in the states? Oh well.

Other than that we are good. Kids are in Japanese school as well and having a blast.
 

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Beer and Cheese
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Congrats Roger, thank you for your long years of service with the NAVY. Good luck to you and the family.
 

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Beer and Cheese
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Nope, its pretty easy. Just put the wet stuff on the red stuff. :)

Where in Japan are you going to live? City so I can google it.
 

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Soon, I am going to have my residency card. think of that, If I can get a residency card in Japan, how come certain people can not do it in the states? Oh well.

Other than that we are good. Kids are in Japanese school as well and having a blast.
Cool!
I've visited japan several times and have always liked the place (esp Tokyo and Hokkaido). I'm not sure I would enjoy doing business there (the work/life balance is pretty awful for sales people over there) but if an opportunity presented itself to have a more stable job there, I'd consider it for a few years.

Depending on how old they get when they leave (perhaps to return to the US), they will have some pretty useful language skills based on this experience.

As far as your comment about why Japan is more free with their residency applications vs. the US, my amateur analysis (not an lawyer of any sort) is that this probably stems from how each country grants citizenship.

Japan is Jus Sanguinis, or citizenship by blood.
US is Jus Soli, or citizenship by soil.

You can live your entire life as a resident of japan and raise kids from birth there but they may never be considered Japanese citizens without jumping through more hoops.

On the other hand, you could be a foreign national in the US and by having your kid in a US hospital, they will be Americans automatically the minute they hit the catcher's mitt (or whatever they use -- I'm not a doctor, either).

I would expect that part of the concern about opening the doors to droves of foreign nationals here in the US through a residency, from the conservative point of view, is that you could spawn a whole new crop of "anchor babies." I would hope that if we are going to have a serious debate about immigration reform back here in the US we would revisit Jus Soli but since it's eshrined in the 14th Amendment, I seriously doubt that will happen and the bickering will continue.

-g
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Cool!
I've visited japan several times and have always liked the place (esp Tokyo and Hokkaido). I'm not sure I would enjoy doing business there (the work/life balance is pretty awful for sales people over there) but if an opportunity presented itself to have a more stable job there, I'd consider it for a few years.

Depending on how old they get when they leave (perhaps to return to the US), they will have some pretty useful language skills based on this experience.

As far as your comment about why Japan is more free with their residency applications vs. the US, my amateur analysis (not an lawyer of any sort) is that this probably stems from how each country grants citizenship.

Japan is Jus Sanguinis, or citizenship by blood.
US is Jus Soli, or citizenship by soil.

You can live your entire life as a resident of japan and raise kids from birth there but they may never be considered Japanese citizens without jumping through more hoops.

On the other hand, you could be a foreign national in the US and by having your kid in a US hospital, they will be Americans automatically the minute they hit the catcher's mitt (or whatever they use -- I'm not a doctor, either).

I would expect that part of the concern about opening the doors to droves of foreign nationals here in the US through a residency, from the conservative point of view, is that you could spawn a whole new crop of "anchor babies." I would hope that if we are going to have a serious debate about immigration reform back here in the US we would revisit Jus Soli but since it's eshrined in the 14th Amendment, I seriously doubt that will happen and the bickering will continue.

-g


I am the only one in the family that is foreign national. My wife and Kids are Japanese nationals. I am only looking at residency at the moment, not citizenship.
 
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