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Discussion Starter #1
You guys know I'm working on my bathroom. Instead of it getting my pictures buried in the picture thread, I'd rather them be here for more centralization of posts / searchability.

This date stamp on the picture shows I've been working on this bathroom since September 22 of 2018!

These are pictures of when I first started. I've posted these elsewhere before, I'm not sure where exactly, but they're here.

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This termite damage was the reason why I stopped working on the bathroom for almost 6 months. I was afraid of finding more damage and / or active termite colonies. Thankfully I didn't find much more damage and no active colonies! I'm thinking the previous owners tented the house.

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All of that wood eventually was replaced once I got the confidence that I both, knew what to do and found no active termite movement.

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With the removal of the damaged wood, I decided to remove the door frame of my hallway. I never liked that thing and always planned on removing it. This provided the perfect opportunity to remove the frame.

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Framing removed.

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Drywall up. The only witness marks of there ever having been a door frame there are the two little "stubs" in the flooring and the "bump" in the ceiling. Once we get flooring put in, the "stubs" will be gone leaving just the little "bump" in the ceiling.

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Then it was onto the window! Everyone told me this support system I built was a bit overkill. When I finished this, I agreed, lol. But hey, better safe than sorry!!

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Old window ripped out. Note additional termite damage here.

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New wood and framing getting setup for the new window.

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Per the wife's request, we built a cubby for putting shampoos and other **** like that on the wall. We talked about placement of said cubby being on the wall opposite the drain side or on the exterior wall for a good amount of time. We decided on the exterior wall to prevent accidental damage to the tile should we ever mount anything directly behind the shower in the bedroom side.

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Stucco work. This was my first time ever doing this. I got help from one of my neighbors who does cement work for a living. I only asked him after my two batches of mix came out looking like soup because I kept adding too much water. All the videos I saw never showed how much water to apply to your mix, it only showed how to apply stucco!! Now I know though and now I can do it myself for the next time I need to do any stucco work.

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You can hardly tell that work was done here. The only way you can really tell is at night when the porch light is on at night making the shadows where the imperfections lie, lol. But during the day, it's pretty hard to tell.

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Onto plumbing! After a few YouTube videos showing how to sweat pipe, and aside from the few pieces of practice pipe I used in the garage, this was my first time sweating pipes. I can't believe how super easy it is to do!

Also, by this point in time, I've already added most of my insulation to the inside of the bathroom.

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I had to extend this upwards as the previous setup was tub only. Sweating pipe "upside down" was also a first for me.

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Removing the mastic was a royal PITA. This compound stuff I got from HD, while it worked, wasn't as easy as I thought it was going to be. I had hoped that this stuff would "do it's thing" and all I'd have to do is just come in and scrape the floor 20 - 30 minutes later, but no. I had to let this stuff sit for at least 4hrs and even then I had to use a metal brush to take it off. After that, I used a scraper to pick up the greasy / oily residue from the floor and dump it in a plastic bag. Afterwards, I used warm soapy water and an old sponge to pick up any remaining residue. I did the entire floor in small batches because eff that, lol.

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Once that was completed, I went and topped off my flooring with self leveling cement. After doing that, I now know that one 50lb bag does about 25sq/ft. I used this stuff because while the floor looked level, it certainly wasn't level. There were areas of the foundation where it sat higher and was "curvy". One of the most notable areas for this was around the toilet drain and the area on the far side of the tub. I have a feeling the rest of my house will need this treatment when it comes to getting floors put in.

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Tub time! I literally went through 3 bathtubs before getting one that wasn't damaged out of the box. Unfortunately, that meant that the tub I wanted wasn't the one I got. I had to "settle" for a low end tub. The tub I wanted was 12" deep, pre-insulated, and had a 45* back. The tub I ended up getting was 10" deep, non-insulated, and a flat back. For the purposes of getting the job done, I ended up getting that tub.

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4 cans of expanding foam stuff later, and I insulated the sumbish myself!! Oh, and the access panel too, lol.

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However, had I known that this effing drain was going to be such a PITA, I would have waited on getting my tub longer. The drain pipe was all sorts of wrong and wouldn't come off. It's one of those things where it's supposed to be a simple job (removing a threaded pipe) but for whatever reason it just doesn't want to comply!!! In the end, it took 24hrs of PB Blaster soak time, heat, and channel locks to get the heffer off.

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This drain pipe though... I went through two of these before I got it right. The first one, my measurements were off. The second one, I didn't realize that the tub wasn't centered to the hole. So the third time, I got a flexi-tube thing and made it work. That's where I'm at with it now, but because of it, I've managed to install the tub!

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Discussion Starter #5
Tub installed!

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You're getting good at this!

Want to come over and do the tub in our house in Louisiana? Come over during Mudbug Madness, and you can have all the crawfish you can eat!

Wait ... might be cheaper to just pay the plumber! ??

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If you don't mind waiting a year and 3 months or more, sure! ?
 
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MudBugMadness 2021.

We'll leave the light on for you! :)

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My bathroom remodel is moving slowly. I took extra time off work during the holidays, but that didn't seem to help any in terms of moving forward with this project. I ended up getting busy with holiday stuff and nothing really got done during this time. I have been working on it bit by bit, but with my wife's work schedule being completely opposite of mine, doing the Mr. Dad thing during the week and every other weekend takes out any available time for me to work on this.

That being said, here is what's done so far! The plumbing has been secured, all the furring strips have been put up, and the water vapor barrier paper is nearly complete. The next step after that will be to finish putting up the insulation on the walls that are between the bathroom and my son's bedroom. Afterwards, it will be installing new plumbing hardware for both the sink and toilet, and then putting up the hardiebacker and the drywall! Those two will have to be on the same day, I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Some more recent progress on the bathroom. Got my first greenboard up! The water vapor barrier paper is more of an overkill thing, but it's a good thing I used it because I ended up sing it as a template for where the holes were going to be on the actual greenboard. Even after measuring all the distances for my pipes and whatnot for my cutouts, all but one hole was off to a certain degree. Had I not done that on the paper, the greenboard would have looked like Swiss Cheese!

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Of course, before doing that, I redid some of the plumbing. The old fixtures were too calcified for me to want to mess with them, so they got cut off and new pipes soldered on.

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Anybody have any idea how to fix this without replacing the door frame? The story behind how it broke like that is like this:

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The door had door handle with built-in lock on it that could only open from the outside with the use of a key. It didn't have a hole in it where one could put a small flat head screwdriver in and twist the lock open that way. I never replaced the door handle as I never thought it'd be an issue. One day, my daughter, she was 4yrs old at the time, goes into the bathroom and locks the door from the inside, walks out of the bathroom, and closes the door. It took a few hours before my wife or I realized what had happened and we gave each other the, "good grief" look. After pondering several different solutions, we decided to kick the door in. The door and door handle sustained no damage but the frame part was ripped. I got some wood glue and proceeded to stick it back together as best I could, but it never came back the way it was. Now that I'm doing all this work, I know that this needs to be fixed before the drywall goes up.
 

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Hollow core doors with frames are cheap in the scheme of things. I'd replace it. If you really want to try, you could predrill from the outside face and run a few screws in it. The face is covered by your trim, so worth a shot, I guess. But absolutely predrill and countersink so your screw heads don't hold the trim out.
 

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For that, if you don't want to replace it, pop it off and clean away any loose wood. Use wood glue on both surfaces then you can screw them together with #8 screws from the side concealed by the trim. Wipe away and excess glue. Let it dry, then sand and re-paint the inside of the jamb. If it's too jagged to get a good seal, you could cut it away with a circular saw and replace it with a piece of dimensional trim (gluing and screwing like before)... beyond that I can only suggest replacing the entire jamb.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It's been a while since I've updated this thread. Mainly because I've had little to no motivation to continue, or if I do have the motivation, I don't have the time to work on it. Well, I've recently had both and some modest progress has been made. Namely, the hardiebacker boards are up save for the cutouts around the window.

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Now the next phase I'm going to work on is the green drywall board, in which I have two questions:

1. How far over do I need the hardiebacker board to be in relation to the tile? Like, will hardiebacker board look just like painted drywall once it's painted? Or does tile need to be over the transition between the hardiebacker board and drywall?

Here's what I mean. Ideally, we want the tile to be lined up with the tub (red line). However, for water penetration prevention purposes, I hung the hardiebacker board 2" beyond the tub. Does this mean that the tile will actually have to be hung over about 1/3" beyond the hardiebacker board now in order to hide the hardiebacker board - drywall transition?

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2. What compound material do I use between the hardiebacker board and drywall to fill it in? Is it thinset, mud, or caulking?
 

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Use fiberglass tape and mortar to tape the seams between the Hardiebacker under the tile, then use regular setting compound and paper tape between the drywall and the Hardiebacker. Feather the seams like normal and tile over it, grout it, and seal it. Hardiebacker looks pretty much like drywall when painted. See some photos below for reference in previous projects of mine...

Here's the other bathroom I tiled in the more recent (2013) addition on the in-laws' place. Mother-in-law picked the colors and fixtures (her house) - an interior decorator I am not!
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Discussion Starter #15
Use fiberglass tape and mortar to tape the seams between the Hardiebacker under the tile
This I've already picked up on and not concerned about. I'm going in with the mentality that I'll be applying mortar to the hardiebacker as mud is applied to drywall. Looking at your photo as the latest example, it just further reinforces that thinking.

then use regular setting compound and paper tape between the drywall and the Hardiebacker. Feather the seams like normal and tile over it, grout it, and seal it. Hardiebacker looks pretty much like drywall when painted.
So you're saying I could just apply mud (compound) between the hardiebacker and drywall joints? Looking at your photos, you have tile going over the hardibacker-drywall joint. It's not quite like what I'm wondering about. I'm curious to know if I in fact have tile go over that joint or if I can have tile before the joint and somehow use some sort of material (mud / compound, caulking, mortar, etc.) to blend the two wall materials together and have them appear seamless? Your picture doesn't quite show this as you have tile going over your hardiebacker-drywall joints.

The "seal it" part you mention, you mean to say seal the tiles?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Looking at your pictures again, I was just looking at the sides but not paying attention to the top. I see at the top of this shower you built appears to be the best example of what I'm asking.
 

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Yep. You'll want to seal the grout lines. The tiles, not so much if they are glazed.

When you tape, use setting compound. It's got Plaster of Paris in it so it cures much harder and helps reinforce the joints. Then you can use regular joint compound as you feather the joints and sand. Anything NOT covered by tile, I taped in this way, rather than mortar/fiber tape, because that can't be sanded smooth for painting. :)

Also, when you paint, use something semi-gloss or higher. It resists moisture a little better than the duller sheens. Unless the drywall at the base is sitting in water, you shouldn't have to concern yourself with moisture problems later on if it gets the occasional splatter.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
When you tape, use setting compound. It's got Plaster of Paris in it so it cures much harder and helps reinforce the joints.
Taking your advice, I'm going to follow your lead. I'll be doing the taping - compound process because it can be sanded smooth for seamless transition.

This is the mud / compound stuff I use for drywall.


Then you can use regular joint compound as you feather the joints and sand. Anything NOT covered by tile, I taped in this way, rather than mortar/fiber tape, because that can't be sanded smooth for painting. :)
The tape you mention, it's not the drywall mesh tape you're talking about, right? If I understand what you're saying, I think it's a type of drywall tape that's solid throughout that's supposed to make drywall joints perfect, right? Is it one of these tapes? If not one of those, what is the correct type of tape I should be looking for?



From what you're saying, it doesn't sound like that's what I need to be using for these joints between the hardiebacker and the drywall. If that's not the stuff, what is the stuff that I would need? And thinking about it, I guess I need to do this same process where the hardiebacker meets the ceiling.
 

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My advice based on your products above, is mainly that topping compound is too weak and soft for drywall joints. It's meant for ... topping. Ceiling/wall textures and the like. It dries to a spongy-like hardness. Plus it'll soak up moisture like a sponge if it gets wet.

I think this is one you linked to, but just use this stuff where you'll have painted, visible seams, and where the drywall butts up to the Hardie: USG Sheetrock Brand 250 ft. Drywall Joint Tape-382175 - The Home Depot

When you mud the tape in, use a 6 inch knife to set the tape into setting compound and let it cure. Use the setting time you feel makes the most sense based on your work pace and job size. Don't go crazy with this stuff, once it gets hard it's a pain to try and sand. USG Sheetrock Brand 18 lb. Easy Sand 45 Lightweight Setting-Type Joint Compound-384210 - The Home Depot

If you have outside corners, just use regular steel cornerbead and use drywall nails every 12-16" or so (be careful not to go too hard as it will bend and deform the corner). If you want you can tape both sides for added strength and cracking resistance. For inside corners, just fold the tape along the crease at the middle and set it in setting compound like your other joints.

Remember, setting compound for setting tape and cornerbead. That's your first coat.

Once that's cured use an 8" knife on both sides of the tape with all purpose joint compound. It's like topping compound but isn't as lightweight and will dry to a harder surface. There is no cement in it though so it just needs to dry, and is easy to sand. As you mud the two sides of the tape on the straight joints and outside corners, only do one side of the inside corners at a time. That way you don't risk disturbing the nice, smooth edge on one side of the corner. Once one corner is dry, mud the other corner. I like this stuff to finish with, but you will want to thin and re-mix it a bit - it should be the consistency of sour cream.: USG Sheetrock Brand 4.5 Gal. Plus 3 Lightweight All-Purpose Pre-Mixed Joint Compound-381466 - The Home Depot

Once you get your inside corners (both sides) done with the 8/10" knife, and do the straight joints on both sides with an 8/10" knife, hit them again with a 12/14" knife. For this final coat you may want to thin the compound a little more to help get it nice and thin where you feather the edges. I don't worry about the 12/14" coat on the inside corners, but you can certainly do so if desired.

Block/sponge sand the inside corners and use a sanding sheet on a pole sander for the straight joints. Using a light with a low angle will help reveal any high spots with their shadows.

Take your time. Doing drywall is a pain, and finishing it is an art - but with patience and the right tools you will do just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The stuff I linked above, I won't use for the bathroom based on your statement of what happens when it gets wet. I'll use the Sheetrock stuff you linked instead. It's definitely more work than the Westpac stuff I've used before, but I'd rather it be done right.

I've done drywall before, and you're right, it's definitely an art! My wife gets impatient with me because I take so long doing drywall and tells me to "just hurry up already" but then when she sees the results, she's like "whoa!" lol.
 
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