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Discussion Starter #21
I've run into a bit of a problem. I didn't think it was going to be an issue at first, but now that I've put up the top drywall sheet, it's indeed an issue. How do I make it so that the 2-gang box doesn't pop out like this? If I could help it, I'd rather not pull down the top drywall sheet. That was a PITA to put up. I will if I have to, but like I said, I'd rather avoid it.

The first picture, you see the gang box flush with the drywall. The second picture, I've plugged in a small flood lamp to emulate the outlet being used later on (a hair dryer, curling iron, etc.). The third picture, is me pulling on the plug, and you can see how much it pops out before unplugging. That's as far as it pops out.

This is the 2 gang box I got. I clipped it on over the stud using the metal bracket using wood screws as intended.


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The only thing I have is "Pull the drywall, and properly anchor that box" because the box is floating somewhat. Now, if there's something behind, you MAY be able to bolt or nail into that through the box ...

RwP
 

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Or you could get an old work box, if you can safely remove the one that's there.
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited by Moderator)
Work box?

The only thing I have is "Pull the drywall, and properly anchor that box" because the box is floating somewhat. Now, if there's something behind, you MAY be able to bolt or nail into that through the box ...

RwP
Talking to my wife about it, she came to the same conclusion. I'll do that, place 2x4 along the back of the box and drill a screw on the left side of the box to secure it to the 2x4. Basically, do what you said, but actually put something behind the box because there's nothing behind the box currently, lol.
 

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Work box?
Old work box. Old is part of the name.

They make new work boxes (for new installs), and old work boxes (for adding into a current install).

Here's an example of an old work box, designed to cut into a hole in drywall: https://www.lowes.com/pd/CARLON-1-G...dard-Rectangular-Wall-Electrical-Box/50046395

And here's a new work box, designed to be nailed into a support stud: https://www.lowes.com/pd/CARLON-1-G...-Switch-Outlet-Wall-Electrical-Box/1000108303

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Well, I took the upper panel down and fixed the problem. I cut a piece of 2x4and wedged it behind the fire-break 2x4 behind the box and the box itself. I used a 3" screw to secure the box to the whole thing on the left side of the box.

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I got the upper drywall panel hung back up and began hanging the rest of the drywall throughout the rest of the bathroom. These are other pictures of my progress so far. I just need two more panels to go and the walls will be done! Though, I'm not sure I'll be able to finish today or not. My box of drywall screws is running pretty low. I know I have enough for the lower panel, but not sure if I have enough for the upper panel as well.

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I'm with ya. As rewarding as it is for the completion and feel of the room, I do hate hanging drywall! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Drywall is up! I even drew lines where the diagonal 1x6 (seen in my last post) is located as that diagonal 1x6 piece is sunken in a good 1/4" or so beneath the 2x4 studs. I did run out of drywall screws on the lower panel here. I ended up finishing the job with wood screws. Can I keep the wood screws up in there or do they need to be replaced with real drywall screws? Why would they need replacing? The pitch and everything is identical between the drywall screws and wood screws. The only obvious difference between the two of them is the metallic material they're made out of. The drywall screws are black and the wood screws are a golden type color.

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I meant to snap this picture earlier and have it be part my last post, but I forgot. This is going to be a PITA to blend with the hardiebacker. I do have a plan on blending though, and an important step in that plan is to grind / sand down the drywall in that area. It's triangular in shape and it's a good 5x7 sized triangle. The reason for this is due to the furring strips and non-structural wood used behind the hardiebacker. I couldn't get the wood to line up perfectly with the 2x4 header and it came out a good 1/4" or so. The furring strip on the 2x4 header, well, without it being where it was at, the drywall would have some give in that corner because of the non-structural wood, which I know would cause problems later on.

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I'm thinking of doing the following in this order for my next tasks:
  • Mortaring the joints of the hardiebacker
  • Mudding the drywall
  • Blending the hardiebacker and drywall
  • Applying RedGuard to the hardiebacker.

I know I have much more to do beyond that, but I feel that these are the required next steps before proceeding forward and having the ability to deviate some on various required tasks.
 

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Q: have you picked out your tile yet?
I just finished a bathroom remodel and this is one place I would spend more money if I had to do it again. Even if some of the tile from HD/Lowes looks nice and is in stock, the defect rate was WAY higher with the cheaper stuff (meaning the spacing of tiles on the same sheet and nicks randomly). This required more effort cutting and moving tile around on a single sheet AND/OR buying 50% more than I needed because I had to return 1/3rd of the sheets. This wastes more time/labor.

In comparison, the subway tile I picked up from a specialist tile shop was much more uniform (even if it did cost a few more bucks per square foot).

I also went with a fancier urethane grout... even though this stuff cost almost as much as the cheapie tile did from Lowes. The reasoning here is that it doesn't require resealing which I've had to do with my old bathroom and that was just annoying.

I see you have a 1 gang, 2 switch. I assume that one is for the light and the other is for a vent/fan, right?
Q: Have you considered swapping out the second switch for a vacancy sensor and/or timer for the fan?
Is there a code requirement for that? In SF, they require all bathroom lights (even LED) to have vacancy sensors) on the lights and humidity sensors for the fans (so they go off when the room gets dry enough). I prefer the old school timer switch on the fan (twist and let go). Most of the time, this would require a 2 gang box which is why I bring it up now before you have everything mudded and taped.

Q: You mentioned worrying about the transition from the hardiboard to the drywall. I assume you will tile the walls in the bathtub. Depending on what you buy, you can also put in tile corner pieces to angle it down. Something like this would help with the transitions so trying to get everything level wont be as big a deal as long as its seamless (tile -> round tile trim -> caulk line -> mudded mold resistant drywall)

One more thing: did you consider putting a GFCI outlet in near the toilet?
I suspect the US will move to bidets eventually. Even if you don't want a super soaker on your butt now, having an outlet behind the toilet just in case you might want one in the future is not much additional effort now (as compared to when your wife decides she wants one and now you have to cut into your bathroom walls again).
 

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I agree with S4gunn ... put in extra outlets now. If nothing else, put a stainless flat cover plate over the outlet box with the junction in it so you can add an outlet later.

ALL electrical in the bathroom should be GFCI/AFCI protected; but instead of putting the test/reset down behind the commode, let it be downstream of a GFCI/AFCI outlet and/or use a GFCI/AFCI breaker in the breaker box. (I'm 64 and weigh 360; you don't want me grunting down under your commode trying to reset a GFCI/AFCI outlet ... )

RwP
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Q: have you picked out your tile yet?
Yes I have. It's a "coffin" style tile with marble pattern similar to the tile pictured here. The tiles are 12x9 (at the widest point). I am concerned about how much tile I have. We got it from some guy on FB Marketplace. We calculated that the total wall space is 77sq/ft so we estimated a minimum of 85sq/ft of tile needed, and we purchased 90sq/ft of tile. The 77sq/ft was not subtracting the cubby hole, the window, and the decorative tile. We probably really only like 65sq/ft. I'm concerned still about the amount of tile we purchased because of potential "whoops" issues when installing the tile.

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Q: Have you considered swapping out the second switch for a vacancy sensor and/or timer for the fan?
Is there a code requirement for that? In SF, they require all bathroom lights (even LED) to have vacancy sensors) on the lights and humidity sensors for the fans (so they go off when the room gets dry enough). I prefer the old school timer switch on the fan (twist and let go). Most of the time, this would require a 2 gang box which is why I bring it up now before you have everything mudded and taped.
No I haven't considered it. Not quite sure if it's a requirement or not. I guess I'll find out later, lol.

Q: You mentioned worrying about the transition from the hardiboard to the drywall. I assume you will tile the walls in the bathtub. Depending on what you buy, you can also put in tile corner pieces to angle it down. Something like this would help with the transitions so trying to get everything level wont be as big a deal as long as its seamless (tile -> round tile trim -> caulk line -> mudded mold resistant drywall)
I actually plan on using a metal trim piece. I'm not quite sure on the actual styling (rounded, corner / flat), but this is what I want

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One more thing: did you consider putting a GFCI outlet in near the toilet?
I suspect the US will move to bidets eventually. Even if you don't want a super soaker on your butt now, having an outlet behind the toilet just in case you might want one in the future is not much additional effort now (as compared to when your wife decides she wants one and now you have to cut into your bathroom walls again).
No I haven't considered that. I also don't think that my wife will want a bidet in this bathroom considering that we want to eventually (5yrs?) sell our house for a bigger one.
 

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No I haven't considered that. I also don't think that my wife will want a bidet in this bathroom considering that we want to eventually (5yrs?) sell our house for a bigger one.
Things can always change.

You are doing a lot of the wiring yourself so the effort might be minimal and the cost even less (one GFCI outlet, one box, a bit more romex from your spool, etc). If you sell in 5 years, the future owners might appreciate it as well.

Here's one more product I didn't know existed until recently and can be helpful if you find youself with boxes set too deeply (perhaps after putting tile on the wall. They let you push out the outlets/switches.

 

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Discussion Starter #33
So question to everyone here who's asked about me adding a GFCI outlet:

Why do you guys ask when I clearly already have one setup as seen in my post about the gang box "popping out"?

It's funny to me because "GFCI" didn't click in my head as an outlet I already have installed :p

And @S4gunn , yes, I was aware of those spacers already. I don't have a need for them on this project but I've used them before on previous projects.
 

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Hey, at least you're not this guy!

A friend of mine from high school hired an "electrician" to do some work and this was his approach. Needless to say he didn't file a permit with the city (probably because, as it turns out, he isn't a registered contractor) and the inspector is having a field day with this one.

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Discussion Starter #36
Hey, at least you're not this guy!

A friend of mine from high school hired an "electrician" to do some work and this was his approach. Needless to say he didn't file a permit with the city (probably because, as it turns out, he isn't a registered contractor) and the inspector is having a field day with this one.
O.M.G.

That is total hack work through and through. I'd have him pay a real electrician and a drywaller to fix his screw ups!
 

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So question to everyone here who's asked about me adding a GFCI outlet:

Why do you guys ask when I clearly already have one setup as seen in my post about the gang box "popping out"?

It's funny to me because "GFCI" didn't click in my head as an outlet I already have installed :p

And @S4gunn , yes, I was aware of those spacers already. I don't have a need for them on this project but I've used them before on previous projects.
My comment was not about GFCI outlets themselves; I assumed you were smart enough that you'd replace any non GFCI outlets with new ones as needed.

I merely wanted to point out that the general trend is to move towards bidets... which unless you want a cold super soaker on your derriere, requires a power outlet. My house's main bathroom (which hasn't been remodeled in 10+ years), doesn't have an outlet nearby, AND has plaster walls so any new outlet installation won't happen unless I plan a more thorough remodel to this room.

Ralph made the comment that because regular outlets can be daisy chained from the LOAD side of the GFCI outlet, you can prevent more "mature" users from having to stoop under the toilet to reset the GFCI outlet in case the circuit gets tripped.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Update. I hate mudding. Especially corners....

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Question here: What do I use to seal the vertical space between the hardiebacker and bathtub? Caulk? RedGuard? Plain old mud?

Same question, but this time for the horizontal space between the tub and hardiebacker board?

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Next question: What do I use to seal the gap between the floor and the bottom edge of the tub? Silicone? Caulk? Something else?

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If it's a big/deep gap, stuff some foam backer rod in there and then use caulk, to act as a second layer of protection if water gets behind the tile. Since you'll be going right up to the edge above with tile there are no pretty points. I would say use silicone so the chances of it shrinking due to age are minimized.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
What's foam backer board? Perhaps I know but don't call it that? And these suggestions is for which area, the tub and hardiebacker, or the tub and concrete area?
 
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