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Discussion Starter #42
Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #43
More mudding done. I just need one more thin layer of mud and then I can start sanding. Once I've finished my first round of sanding, I'll be taking my light to check for ridges and imperfections in my work.

When sanding is done, I'll be moving on to RedGuard and then painting. I think after that, I'll do the shower tile.

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Nice. I hope you have a good respirator for the sanding. In the beforetimes, you could always get an N95 pretty easily. Now, well, hope you have something better than a "tshirt" or "**** it, my exposed chin makes me look manly as I do manly things." :)
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Luckily enough, we have one N95 mask left.

I did some light sanding last night after taking that picture and I'd forgotten how bad the dust levels were. I thought I was going to be able to handle the light sanding. Boy, was I wrong! I wasn't even covered, it was just enough sanding to sanding to remove the large burrs and even out the screw holes.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
I am finding myself with little motivation to continue with this project in recent months / weeks.

That said, I did put some more work into this today and I'm happy to announce that I've finished mudding and sanding!

I just need to finish cleaning up my dust mess and I'll be applying redguard, likely within the next hour or two.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
So a while back, I laid down self leveling cement to even out the floor. It evened out and I was almost happy with the results at the time. I felt that the floor could have been flatter as I still felt height variations underneath my feet. I did a bonehead move and added more self leveling cement to the floor in the areas that I felt were low and the results are absolute sh!t. I should have just left it alone because the original results were far better than the results I got with adding a second layer of self leveling cement.

Now, I'm at the point now where I'm starting to think about what flooring I'm going to be using and I obviously need to address this issue. So the questions I have are:

1. Do I just use more self leveling cement for the entirety of the bathroom floor?

2. Do I just use thinset (or whatever tile cement is called), to level out the floor and not worry about it?

If opting with option 1, then I have an area of 5' x 6-1/2 (32.5sq/ft.). I currently have about half a bag of self leveling cement mix available for me to use if going that route. Would half a bag be sufficient or would I need somewhere between 60% - 80% of a bag?

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The Parts Guy
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Those pictures don't tell us much. Put a straight edge on it. If the variance is minimal across the floor (less than 1/4"), it can be sorted with thinset when setting tile.
 

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I helped my contractor lay the tile in a house because a) I wanted to learn the process, b) my contractor/neighbor was amenable to teaching and getting extra help and c) I'm a cheap bastard so I didn't hire a white glove contractor who would take care of everything as long as I kept pouring money into his pocket.

To give us a flat surface to lay tile over the subfloor, he laid down this stuff and we put the tile on top of that. The transition can be managed at the doorway (in this house, it was already fairly high anyway).

In a house from 1920, no floor is ever perfectly level but you don't notice it as much as you would notice if one tile was higher than the others or the gap was more.
What surprised me was even with small hexagon tiles where the stuff is already on a mesh, there would be noticeably larger gaps on ~50% of the sheets we got from HD or Lowes. I ended up buying way more than I needed, sorting them on site, and returning the excess.

Even larger pieces (I think I used 12x18" tiles in the laundry room) weren't completely uniform on their sizing (length, width, or thickness) so you needed to use the thinset to "cheat". It also helped that the pattern laid out was offset like bricks instead of one after the other (which would have made the slide size differences noticeable).
 

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You don't want uneven tiles, so you can level the floor now by sanding the self leveler or level it out with the thin set while you set the tiles as long ss there isn't too much variance. It will be easier to deal with now.
 

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The Parts Guy
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I helped my contractor lay the tile in a house because a) I wanted to learn the process, b) my contractor/neighbor was amenable to teaching and getting extra help and c) I'm a cheap bastard so I didn't hire a white glove contractor who would take care of everything as long as I kept pouring money into his pocket.

To give us a flat surface to lay tile over the subfloor, he laid down this stuff and we put the tile on top of that. The transition can be managed at the doorway (in this house, it was already fairly high anyway).
Yes, a cement board should be laid (with thinset and screws) over a subfloor to provide a flat surface for tile. It looks like the OP has a concrete floor (slab construction), in which case it isn't needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
So I'll be laying down tile likely tomorrow. Before I do though, I want to ask you guys what I should do about this gap between the bathtub and the floor. It's about 1/4" wide +/- 1/8".

Like, I know it should get some sort of gap filler, but I'm not sure on the type of gap filler. Should it be caulk, silicone, or something else?

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Does the rest of your house have floorboards? Mine does so this was the logical solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
I ended up using just regular ol DAP brand caulk to fill in the gap and spread it out evenly using a spread tool (IDK what it's actually called). I'm just waiting for it to dry enough and I'll be laying down another layer or self leveling cement, ~1/8" thick or so. The "oops" I made previously with the self leveling cement has gaps in areas roughly 1/8" and I'm too OCD to want to fix it with just thinset, hence another layer of the self leveling cement.


Does the rest of your house have floorboards? Mine does so this was the logical solution.
My entire house is on slab foundation.
 

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Yeah I put the DAP on after fixtures are installed .. Like to seal a sink to the countertop, backsplash or around the bottom of the toilet. Finish product. I wouldnt worry about gaps since the thinset and tile will build up and then dap / silicone the bottom of the tub to the tile.

Careful on the self leveling layers .. It can build up with that, thinset, and tile thickness.
 

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I ended up using just regular ol DAP brand caulk to fill in the gap and spread it out evenly using a spread tool (IDK what it's actually called). I'm just waiting for it to dry enough and I'll be laying down another layer or self leveling cement, ~1/8" thick or so. The "oops" I made previously with the self leveling cement has gaps in areas roughly 1/8" and I'm too OCD to want to fix it with just thinset, hence another layer of the self leveling cement.




My entire house is on slab foundation.
Sorry. wrong name. I meant baseboards.
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Discussion Starter #57
I finished the second layer of self leveling cement earlier today. Here's what it looks like. It went down much like the very first layer did. I did do an "oops" this time around again 🤦‍♂️. I forgot to plug up the toilet holes. I'm going to have to drill out the cement that fell into the holes tomorrow. Not a big deal, but still a big deal, LMAO.

40016


Yeah I put the DAP on after fixtures are installed .. Like to seal a sink to the countertop, backsplash or around the bottom of the toilet. Finish product. I wouldnt worry about gaps since the thinset and tile will build up and then dap / silicone the bottom of the tub to the tile.
Normally I would too. But I didn't know what to use and I know DAP holds water back so I used it. I'll use it again once I've laid down the tile and use a 1/8" bead on the finished product on the edge between the tile and bathtub.

Careful on the self leveling layers .. It can build up with that, thinset, and tile thickness.
Yeah, I'm aware. I tried to use the thinnest layer possible. This should be ~3/16" thick. It's more or less level with the highest spots of the imperfections I had previously from my "oops".

Sorry. wrong name. I meant baseboards.
Baseboards! Yes, my house has baseboards. But I'm going to be doing flooring here in a few months and we'll be replacing the baseboards along with the flooring. The wife and I are thinking of using whatever tile we select to also use as our baseboards. Something like this is what we'll end up doing with a rounded metal edge on top.

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So you can fill the gap by installing the new baseboards in the bathroom after the tile is set.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Yesterday was a bit frustrating to get started on working on tile, but we finally got started......at 8pm, lol.

My dad had a manual tile cutter so I went to go pick it, and an angle grinder, up. It ended up being a little dinky 12" tile cutter. Our tiles are 12x24. Clearly that's not going to work for the long cuts. So I went out and bought me a new manual tile cutter that supports up to 24" tiles. I have to return it now, lol. My wife reminded me that the tiles we bought will chip easily along the edges of my cuts, a common thing with ceramic and porcelain tile apparently. A couple test cuts later and we decided that we were buying a wet saw. A second trip to Home Depot and we got ourselves a Rigid brand wet tile cutter.

When we finally got started measuring our tile and started making our cuts, it was 8pm. Far too late to be using our new wet tile saw outside as it'd disturb our neighbors, so I decided to leave it inside and start making our cuts in our dining room!

This is the first time that we're doing any sort of tiling work and are just going off of what we've read online and YT videos. If something is wrong, or there's a better approach to something you see, please let me know. I'm all for learning more.

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Bathroom mocked up with tile.

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And yes, the dining room, along with much of my house, will be getting new tile here soon. Likely, it'll be after re-doing my son's bedroom.

Oh, and that angle grinder I got from my dad. That's been a lifesaver on all those little cuts!
 
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