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What's the best/easiest way to remove tint.
The 97 evidently had been in a wreck before so the tint doesn't match from drivers to passenger side.
the film appears to be a high quality film incoorectly applied. It's tougher than old nails, but has a lot of ripples and waves.
i want to remove it from the passenger side and rear windows then have the car done again.
the quotes from tint shops to remove are incredable $150-$300 for removal then pay for the tint $150-$200.
I want to save some bucks and make sure i have clean glass, not some hocus pokus to put new film over old.
 

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the easiest way? go cash your pay check and pay the tint shop the $150~300 bucks they want to remove it. Pick your car up and inspect it when it's done and once your satisfied with the job they did then arrange to have it retinted. :D ;)

A razor blade scraper is what I used to remove the tint on my parents house windows before they had them retinted with a heavy 3m tint/safety film.

It's not fun, much less so on something like the back window of the Tbird.

I used a spray bottle of *lightly* soapy water and liberally sprayed the tint down good and let is absorb for awhile then started scraping and keep everything wet. The water soaks into the tint and loosens it up and also helps the blade slide on the glass...

Have fun, it's going to be a mess inside the car. You might want to cover everything in plastic first to keep the water and scrapings of the interior...

the scraper I used was a plastic handled one from the hardware store that used the angled razor blades like razor knives use. A nice and wide blade and it might flex a bit better to the curves of auto glass plus it's held in plastic that has a bit of give as well.
 

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its not that hard, use a spray bottle with some soapy hot water, then use a razorblade (the ones used to remove window stickers) just be careful not to use the side of the blade and scratch the window. I did this when my friend got ticketed for his limo tints on his explorer. took about 45 min per window to get all the film and the residue off.
 

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The tint I had to remove wasn't about to "pull off" after baking in the hot FL sun for years... No idea what it was, some stuff my father had bought at the store and put up himself.

The company that was going to be laying down the new 3M stuff charged something like $60/hr for extra stuff like moving furniture around etc. - presumable that's what they would of charged for removal as well.
 

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I'm tellin' ya... peel it off the best you can, spray it with "Goo Gone", let it soak for 15 minutes, and the rest will just wipe off with a paper towel. Goo Gone's at wally world for about 3$ a bottle. It's orage :)
 

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I have been tinting windows for 8 years, with my experience of removing the tint i believe it is indeed best to just peel off what you can by hand first...But you may be able to weaken the adhesive if you get either a heat gun or hair dry and heat up the outside of the glass and then try to peel the tint off...This works well with some tints and it also depends on how old the tint is..Then it is down to the soapy water and razor blades to get the glue off....Nothing to difficult just time consuming..If you wanted to save money try to tint the rear quarters yourself....After a little practice you will be surprised what you can do...add 1 oz of rubbing alcohol with soap and water to aid the drying time of the tint.....good luck!
 

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Glad I found this thread. I've already removed the tint from a 1971 Cheby Nova that I'm helping a friend restore, and I'm tryin to find out how to best remove the film. It was old and baked on pretty well.

Gonna try the soapy water when I get a chance.

If not, then the "goo gone" or the PB Blaster adhesive remover.
 

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Goo Gone is great stuff but I wouldn't even think of using it on large areas inside of my car. No way. While they say "Citrus power" and show oranges on the bottle and state "Citris power and scientific technology combine to defeat the toughest stains" the reality is a little different.

On the back it states "Non-toxic" and "Contains petroleum distillates. If swallowed do not induce vomiting. call a physician immediately. Aviod prolonged contact with skin. Use in well ventilated area. Do not use near heat, sparks or flames."

The power of Goo Gone isn't "Citrus Power" but "Petroleum Power". :thumbsup:

That's why is cuts through stuff like stickers - make up - oil - wet paint - scuff marks - shoe polish - tree sap - asphalt - candle wax - tape - glue - grease.

What petroleum solvents don't cut through all that stuff? I think the main purposes of the citrus is marketing and to simply try and mask the pungent smell of petroleum solvents. It does have a very strong "off note" citrusy smell to it due the solvents. :(

I won't use it on any surfaces I wouldn't use a petroleum based solvent on. Any kind of plastic or paint i'd test in a hidden spot first and be quick about it and wash with soapy water afterwards to remove any residue.

It's a great product for specific spot cleaning or tough stuff but I wouldn't use it in volume on my car windows for a couple of reasons.

1) Your going to have runoff. The trickle down water/cleaner is going to get into the door or under the plastic trim of the quarter windows. soapy water will just evaporate and leave a bit of soapy residue. Goo Gone has a pungent smell that lasts a long time and I woldn't want the residue of that stuff inside my trim and doors. Any time I use the stuff I have to follow up with a soapy water wash to get rid of the residue and smell. All citrus cleaners have a strong smell that lingers until you wash up with something else like lots of soapy water.

2) the possiblity of it dripping on plastic, paint, carpets, fabric and messing it up or leaving it smelly.

3) the possibilty of missing a spot while washing up afterwards and the petroleum residue screwing up the new tint job in that spot and keeping it from bonding.

A just squirted a bit on my glass desktop and put a lighter to it and it didn't ignite but don't take my word as gospel that it doesn't burn under the right conditions.

All the directions and use caveats on the bottle are what you expect to read on any bottle of solvents. They even say wash the area with soapy water afterwards too.

Suuuuure it's the power of citrus power. lol
 

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I've seen windex sprayed on the tint and putting a garbage bag on the tint like the tint is to the glass "kinda like your tinting your window with the trash bag" and letting it bake in the hot sun for a few hours and then pulling the trash bag off and the tint follows. windex contains ammonia which eats the adhesive
 

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I spoke with my tint guy about this some time ago, and he told me the same thing that dwinthrup said. Spray the tint with soapy water, cover with a black trash bag, and leave in the Fl sun for a couple of hours. This pulls the tint off, and leaves the defrost wires intact.

Side windows can work the same way, but using a razor is quicker.
 

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Id have the tint guy do that back window this way if he messes it up its on him

does your car have rear defrost lines?

my GN came from the south and it doesnt have a rear defroster the previous owner said it wasnt required in the south?
 
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