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Discussion Starter #1
I am home from school and trying to do this, can someone please help me!
The wires that lead to the sensor are not the colors described in the tech articles, I dont think I am close to getting this right. Can someone please walk me through this and help me get my car working!

Thanks alot
Will
 

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If you have access to a data reader...plug it in to the OBD port and watch the TPS reading. Or you can get a multimeter and stick the black lead into the back of the connector where the black wire is. The voltage is read from the middle wire unless I'm mistaken. Check both non black wires until you get a voltage reading. Oh yeah the key must be on too. Hope this helps some!
-Rob
 

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Thanks for bringing up this question.

I have read that with EEC-V the "adjustment" of the TPS is no longer necessary. The EEC "learns" the idle value (i.e. the voltage with the TB closed) and the WOT value (i.e. the voltage when the TB is fully open) during the learning stage driving cycle. Then it just takes those voltages and divides the difference into the necessary "chunks" to know the position at all ranges of TB opening.

Is this true?

I know on the EEC-IV that it has to be adjusted, but I thought on EEC-V it did not need to be adjusted.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So I grind out one of the bolt holes, how much?
I turn my car on, only the accessory, not the engine
Bolt the one side in and begin to turn the tps,
While I am doing this I will be reading the voltage from my voltmeter from the middle(possibly black wire) which I have cut throught the plastic to read?
I get it closest to .98 and thats it?

Thanks everyone


DailyDriven,
I dont think it is absolutesly necessary, the OBD II does compensate for the mixture but it is better to do it anyway. My car has been running strange without the tps turned properly, and I have no heat because of it:(

Will
 

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Will3799 said:

DailyDriven,
I don’t think it is absolutely necessary, the OBD II does compensate for the mixture but it is better to do it anyway. My car has been running strange without the tps turned properly, and I have no heat because of it:(

Will
I'm not arguing or anything, but how in the world could a wrong TPS signal in any way effect the heating system?!? :2huh:

I just think you’re going down the wrong path in adjusting the TPS and doing unnecessary work. Especially if you have a heating system problem. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
DailyDriven
I recently installed a F150 70mm tb. After, not having a properly calibrated tps the heat and throttle response does not work properley. I know that it isnt calibrated so once I do it if for some reason, the probles still exists I will have to look elsewhere
 

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Discussion Starter #7
how much do i drill/file one of the bolt holes on the tps, I dont want to go to far?
 

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Will3799 said:
how much do i drill/file one of the bolt holes on the tps, I dont want to go to far?
I would check the voltage as is, before even removing the TPS. It could very well be right on.

As mentioned above, I highly doubt that your TPS could have anything to do with the HVAC system.

-Rod
 

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Sounds like a vac leak.... I have heard of people with the F150 TB having brake issues because of a vac loss. Put the old TB back on or look for you Vac leak... That Truck TB isn't even worth the trouble for the gains your are getting, 65-70mm TB? GImme a break, buy a 75MM unit at least if that is what you are trying to accomplish, still won't even net you that much on a NA car unless you got something goin on...
 

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Will3799 said:
DailyDriven
I recently installed a F150 70mm tb. After, not having a properly calibrated tps the heat and throttle response does not work properley. I know that it isnt calibrated so once I do it if for some reason, the probles still exists I will have to look elsewhere
That is bogus (assuming you have a 99 F150 TB)! I did the same mod years ago. You do not have a TPS problem look elsewhere for the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, I know my tps is not properly calibrated; it had been removed before I installed it. I cannot just reinstall my stock tb because I have ported my intake elbow to match the tb. Please help me calibrate this sensor.

How much should I port one of the intake bolts on the sensor, I am checking the voltage from the middle wire going into the tps?

I know my tps isn’t calibrated properly so I would like to get this done first. Once it is out of the way I will begin to look elsewhere if the problem persists.

Someone please help me, calibrate this sensor
 

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You dont necessarily have to hog out the holes to adjust it. The first step is to see what your voltage is right now using either a multimeter or a data reader. Just loosen the screws, twist the sensor, and see what you can do with it before drilling out the holes though. Hope this helps some :)
-Rob
 

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If youre useing a 5.4 T/B, you should first of all check the values that the tps is giving you, and also adjust the idle bleed air , with the li'l adjustable bleed air plug in the underside of the T/B next to the TPS.You see its set up to supply approx 18% more air than necessary on a 4.6.. It takes a metric allen wrench to adjust... also just because you hogged out a whole whopping big 5mm in the gooseneck doesnt mean you cant go back to stock on your T/B... considering the flow direction , you will not even get boundary layer turbulance... it just isnt that big a deal, and the TPS readings will have absolutely no bearing on engine heat . As Miller said its not your prob, but if you are bound and determined, get the meter on the hot wire, and a groungd , check it first, and amazingly you will figure it out by your own self, loosen the bolts if you must , and play with existing slack to get a better reading... in any case good luck
 

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I have the same mods you have and more. I went though this a few years ago when I installed my 5.4L in an EEV V Car. The "expert tuner who shall remain nameless" stated that if I have a problem with how my car runs it is the installation, not the chip.

I had a surging/ stalling problem and took his word and checked everyt9ing including the TPS. I found the latter not to be much value. Anyhow it was the Idle Air Adjustment in my EEC that was at fault.

So here we go:

Check the voltage to the TPS:
Turn the key off.
Remove the TPS.
Measure voltage between VREF and SIG RTN at the harness connector.
The voltage should be between 4 and 6 volts, if not you have other problems.


Then read this:


How To Adjust TPS
Muscle Mustangs & Fast Fords"
April 1993
The throttle position sensor is one of those things that falls into the category of "computer stuff" that makes a big difference and is easy to deal with, but average people like us would never know about. Without the proper adjustment, the throttle position sensor (TPS) will give the computer a false reading as to the exact throttle opening. A false reading will limit wide open throttle performance (something we definitely don't want). A voltage reading must be taken using a digital volt/ohmmeter (DVOM) with the Key On/Engine Off and with the Key On/Engine Running. A Radio Shack DVOM, part No. 22-185A, works well for this job.

The TPS is located directly on top of the throttle body and is adjusted by loosening the two phillips mounting screws and swiveling the sensor until the highest reading is found. It may be necessary to elongate the holes with a small file to achieve the desired reading.

The spec range for Key On is from .88 to 1.0 volt; shoot for the .97 to .99 volt. With the engine running, the voltage should be no higher than 1.05 volts.

Incorrect Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) voltage will result in reduced performance. The best way to take a TPS voltage reading is by using two safety pins through the wires coming from the sensor. The positive lead is attached to the green wire, while the negative goes to the black wire. Always ground the meter through the sensor's black wire. This gives a direct, and more accurate ground into the computer.
 
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