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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, had a Trac-Lok with 3.55 gears installed yesterday, I'm just wondering about the consequences of forgetting to turn off the Traction Conrol? ABS damage? Whatta think.
 

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Leaving the traction control on and trying to burn out? Is that what your asking? If so the only consequence I can think of is increased rear pad wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
no, i mean with a posi can traction control malfunction to a point of failure and possibly ABS damage due to it braking one wheel while to other still spins.
 

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As far as I understand, traction control works at each wheel independently of all the other wheels so I don't see how one wheel spinning and one locked up can cause it to malfunction. Traction control doesn't do anything until it senses wheel spin and then it applies the brakes, as I understand, so all that will probably happen is you'll cause your barkes to wear faster than normal - assuming you have wheel spin frequently.

Dennis
 

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As one on here with the open axle and traction control (not traction lock), I can personally say that traction control hasn't done very much for me in the past...
 

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As one on here with the open axle and traction control (not traction lock), I can personally say that traction control hasn't done very much for me in the past...
In defense of traction control, I've owned 8 Mustangs in the past - almost all with V-8's and wide tires. They were ALL virtually undriveable in snow, in fact, they were almost dangerous to drive in snow! I had an '88 Mustang LX with a 302 V-8 and auto trans that I purchased snow tires for - those snow tires (Dunlops) transformed the car into THE BEST car I ever drove in snow!

I also owned a 2000 Mustang GT that had the same tires on it my 1988 had - Goodyear Gatorbacks. That car also had traction control. Due to my job situation at the time, I was unable to purchase snow tires for that car before the first snowfall during the time I owned it. However, I was stunned the first time I drove it in snow - it drove every bit as good as my 1988 did with the snow tires!

At least in snow, traction control is worth every penny!

Dennis
 

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I suppose my opinion isn't based on too much background - last winter I had practically bald tires, and the ABS had a blown fuse so TC wasn't working either. Perhaps this year with the ABS back in commission and new tires, I'll get better luck out it. On wet roads I think I've had it engage on me a couple times, but it only makes a difference when I keep my foot out of the throttle.
 

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I don't see any real issues, Ford just viewed them as being redundant.
 

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Basically, by installing the trac-lok unit you have disabled the traction control function of the ABS. It only operates when the two rear wheels are spinning at different speeds (as in the case of one wheel having lost traction), but the trac-lok will keep the two wheels linked essentially all of the time, so the ABS won't sense the difference in wheel speeds and traction control won't engage.
 

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I'd be more concerned with the trac-loc...

I don't know for sure, but.. if the Traction control does have reason to activate, and applies the brakes to one wheel... how will that affect the clutches in the trac-loc?
 

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In defense of traction control, I've owned 8 Mustangs in the past - almost all with V-8's and wide tires. They were ALL virtually undriveable in snow, in fact, they were almost dangerous to drive in snow! I had an '88 Mustang LX with a 302 V-8 and auto trans that I purchased snow tires for - those snow tires (Dunlops) transformed the car into THE BEST car I ever drove in snow!

I also owned a 2000 Mustang GT that had the same tires on it my 1988 had - Goodyear Gatorbacks. That car also had traction control. Due to my job situation at the time, I was unable to purchase snow tires for that car before the first snowfall during the time I owned it. However, I was stunned the first time I drove it in snow - it drove every bit as good as my 1988 did with the snow tires!

At least in snow, traction control is worth every penny!

Dennis
These aren't mustangs. The handling dynamics are totally different.

I've had this car in rain, snow, ice and anything else nature could dish out and I can say 100% from the bottom of my heart the traction control these cars came with is utterly useless. The biggest improvement for keeping control on slick roads is a trac-lok.
 

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I can think of at least once that I was glad my T-bird had Traction Control

In 2002 my wife of the time and I went to visit a beautiful place called "Blue spring" in South Central Missouri. To get to the spring, we had to drive down a steep hill, on a rough, gravel path. Getting there was easy, coming back and climbing that hill I could feel the traction control working and preventing tire spin on those razor like rocks that the ozarks is famous for. This was my first MN12, a V6 Prairie Tan 97.
 

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These aren't mustangs. The handling dynamics are totally different.

I've had this car in rain, snow, ice and anything else nature could dish out and I can say 100% from the bottom of my heart the traction control these cars came with is utterly useless. The biggest improvement for keeping control on slick roads is a trac-lok.
No, Thunderbirds are NOT Mustangs, but driving a Thunderbird and a Mustang in snowy conditions is VERY similar - they are both nose-heavy rear-wheel drive cars with traction control systems that are implemented much the same way. The only really meaningful difference between the two cars would be tire types.

To say that a traction-lok axle is better at maintaining control on slippery surfaces than traction control is an utterly ludicrous statement - traction-lok is just a mechanical means of 'locking' (limited slip, not locked) the two rear wheels such that both drive wheels are powered at the same time. While this does provide a similar effect it is also keeping the wheel with poor traction spinning at or close to the same speed which will make the vehicle more prone to sliding, where as traction control can modulate the brakes (MUCH faster than is humanly possible) to continuously switch between sides depending on which is spinning more to keep the vehicle more planted.

Are you sure your traction control wasn't switched OFF when you were driving in bad weather?!!

Dennis
 

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Are there wheel speed sensors for the front wheels? I would assume if there were, the speed difference between the front and rear tires would cause traction control to kick in, wouldn't it? I've never owned anything with traction control, so I wouldn't have any experience with it but just from the basics I know, I would assume it would still know that the back tires have lost traction by going from the speed of the front wheels.
 

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Basically, by installing the trac-lok unit you have disabled the traction control function of the ABS. It only operates when the two rear wheels are spinning at different speeds (as in the case of one wheel having lost traction), but the trac-lok will keep the two wheels linked essentially all of the time, so the ABS won't sense the difference in wheel speeds and traction control won't engage.
Not necessiarly true. Depending upon the condition of the clutch packs within the TL, plus the amount of load provided by the spring (i.e. stock, F150, etc) the amount of "slip" can vary. To my knowledge, at no time are the wheels "linked" unless an ARB air locker or spool has been installed.

Personally I like the traction control of my Mark VIII because you can nail it in a sharp turn and not kick the rear end out. :D

But it sucks because it pulls timing (IIRC 15 deg OR MORE) for a set amount of time whether you're spinning or not. :bawling:
 

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Not necessiarly true. Depending upon the condition of the clutch packs within the TL, plus the amount of load provided by the spring (i.e. stock, F150, etc) the amount of "slip" can vary. To my knowledge, at no time are the wheels "linked" unless aN ARB air locker or spool has been installed...
:zwthstpd:
Trac-lok does not lock the wheels. It directs torque to whichever wheel has more traction as opposed to an open rear that sends torque to whichever wheel has less (or no) traction.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
so with the Trak-Lok differential should I turn off the Traction Assist or not worry and leave it on?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I know to turn it off if I want to lay rubber but with Trak-Lok during everyday driving (not trying to spin wheels) it's probably safer to leave it off. Sound right?
 

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I would leave it on. There are plenty of vehicles out there with Trak-Lok's and traction control that have no problem.

I would leave it on unless, like you said you're wanting/expecting some tire spin.

But just my .02. :thumbsup:
 

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A trac-lok does not send more torque to the wheel with more traction. It is not that fancy. Yes, it does 'tie' the rears together, but it also allows slip in the clutches during a turn. The spring determines how much force is required to slip the clutches and allow independent movement of the axle shafts. The spring is not a sophisticated traction sensing/torque dividing computer nor does it make a clutch LSD function as a geared LSD (ie. Torsen).

That being said, just turn the traction control off. Nothing will be harmed either way, but it just makes more sense to leave it off, I do.
 
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