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Who here is from TX? Who here has moved FROM CA to TX? The wife and I are considering the move but there are some things we don't know and need more info about.

I'm on a FB group about people moving from CA to TX, and the people in that group are making me not want to move because a bunch of them are a bunch of douche bags, yet they brag about "Southern Hospitality". Eff that. If the people in that group already in TX are like that, they can keep that hypocrisy to themselves all day long.

Cost of living is a big reason why the wife and I are considering the move. But looking around on Redfin, Realtor.com, and asking in that FB group I'm on, a mortgage out there will be a little more than what I pay for out here. Renting an apartment or a house out there seems to be no less than $1,500 and goes up to about $2,300 which is actually several hundred more than what I pay in mortgage out here in CA. Even at a TX "low rent" of $1,500. All said and done, whatever I'm "saving" on other things like taxes, vehicle registration, etc., here in CA comes out to be a wash because of a higher mortgage / rents out there. Then they don't have anything similar to Prop 13 where your property tax is tied to the purchase price of your home, but instead fluctuates yearly based on the assessed value of your home. Knowing what my mortgage will be every year for the life of my mortgage loan is pretty effing epic, if you ask me.

A big reason for us to stay is because my employer has effing bomb-diggity ass health insurance. For example, remember when my son was in the hospital for just about two weeks? I paid $0 out of pocket. Yes, $0. Yes, I know I'm not making what I could be making with another employer either here in CA or in TX, but not having to pay a deductible for a hospital visit and only a $50 co-pay for an emergency room visit that does not result in being admitted to the hospital is pretty epic if you ask me. The #2 reason for us to stay is because of family. Out there we won't have anyone to go visit just because / birthdays / holidays, or to help us out in an emergency.

From my understanding, TX is a pretty flat state. That flat state means there's no mountains and canyons to carve it up on. Here in CA, I've got 2 mountain roads I can climb up just 10 minutes from my driveway. If I go a little further, I've got 4 more mountains and canyons as options to carve up on. It's definitely something I enjoy doing and want to do more of it.

Then there's the weather. It's pretty effing epic here in SoCal all year long. No snow unless we want it in winter. Low humidity during summer which means it's a dry heat, not that "hot wet blanket wrapped around you" crap. There's beaches in as little as 1.25hrs from where I live. In most of TX it seems that tornadoes are an annual occurrence. I don't really want to worry about those every year. Here in CA, yes there are earthquakes that happen daily, but those are tiny and hardly ever felt. There's "the big one" everyone has been talking about since I could remember, but big earthquakes happen every few decades and never in the same spot.

Sure, there are some parts of it that suck, I'll admit. But overall, it really isn't as bad as "outsiders" make it seem. All the taxes that spur up that are heard about in the news are mainly in LA and SF proper. CA is a big effing state. Just venture 30min in any direction away from those cities and you won't be getting any of those taxes unless they're county or state taxes. EG, that new Uber and Lyft tax they're talking about. I live about 2hrs east of LA and my area of CA is a pretty dark purple. The emissions thing does suck for us car enthusiasts, but there are ways around it also, basically, it only matters at smog time.

Overall, the talking points for making TX like a good opportunity are not as great as they initially sounded.

Can anyone who lives / lived in TX provide more info that would help convince me one way or another about moving or not moving to TX?
 

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I grew up in Houston, TX.

I didn't know racism until I moved north. I'm sure there are racists everywhere, but I went to school with everyone, white, black, hispanic, asian, middle eastern, etc. I didn't know anyone (or at least didn't associate with them) who was actually racist.

Southern hospitality IS a real thing. You don't need tow trucks in Texas if you go off the road. Wait a little bit and two guys in a pickup will come by soon with a tow rope and get you out. They live for this.
You'll eat better than you have anywhere else in the country. People really are genuinely friendly overall. Yes, some people come off as douches over the web, but don't worry about that. There are douches everywhere, they're always going to show up in groups.

Taxes are MUCH better in Texas. Freedoms are much better if you happen to be a gun owner/enthusiast. The weather is hotter than CA, but everywhere is Air Conditioned.

I'd be happy to move back. The real only downside is in the Houston area, you need gills to breath between April and November.

Not 100% sure where Redfin is, but Houston is flat as a pancake, as is Dallas/Ft Worth. Austin is the hilly area, I think there's mountains in the Panhandle/north central part of Texas but not 100% sure. If you need mountains, Colorado is right there.
 

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Portions of Texas are hilly; the foothills of the Ozarks head through Arkansas to Texas.

Shucks, portions of East Texas are a bit hilly; not to Arkansas levels, but then, depending on WHERE in Texas, Arkansas hills may be just 3 or 4 hours away. (Or less ... it gets hilly going northeast from Texarkana - a dual city, used to be two cities, Texarkana TX and Texarkana AR, but is now one city as it's consolidating!)

Source: I run Northwest LA, Southwest AR, and East TX.

Now, if you pick West Texas - well, the road doesn't change much from around Midland over to into the foothills of the Rockies and the Rockies on your way to California. :)

RwP
 

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You can't "pre-approve" an area you're moving into; Do it, and THEN find good people. :)

Most people are worth a ****, but the noise from the douchebags drowns it out online. :D
 

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We have family out in San Antonio. It helps to have people you know where you want to go. Most of my family is still in California though.

You cant beat the weather in Ca. TX is Hot as ****. That thing about no mountains really weirded me out when I went to visit … I live in the valley surrounded by mountains - so it was a huge shock to me. But like you said .. drive 30 minutes Southwest and im in Santa Cruz beach. Drive about 4 hours north, and I can go to the snow in Lake Tahoe. Five hours south and im in Disneyland.

For me, a "long drive" to get fast food is like 10 minutes away. Over there, it might be an hour drive if you want something in the next town over.

The pay / job situation is a huge factor. Over there my fellow tradesmen make half of what I make - so they travel here to make the big money. But cost of living is lower in some cases. Its just that you get a lot more for what you pay for over there, if you can pay for it.


If I decide to leave this state, it will be to TX .. when my kids finish school - maybe 10 years. Equity in my house is well over a million dollars currently, so I can retire, collect my pension and 401k and build a nice house on a decent size piece of land when I get there, if I go there. But I certainly wouldn't leave if you have a good job / living situation right now.
 

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One thing I have heard ,if you’re coming from California leave your politics behind . They DO NOT like that here . Hear that all the time .
 

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I've lived in the Houston area all my life, so I can answer most questions about this particular part of TX.

I won't go into the various positive aspects of life here, because the OP reads more like a travel brochure. The thread seems rather pointless, as you're clearly enthralled with Cali life and want to stay put, and are essentially looking for excuses to NOT move to TX.

Here are some potential ones to help cement your decision to stay where you're happy :laugh::

1) Most people in any given part of TX won't take kindly to snobbery and yammering on about the superiority and glory of CA. We are generally hospitable, but that **** will get you snubbed and/or flamed jiffy quick. Word spreads quickly, too, and everyone in the neighborhood will know about you in short order — if it's a small town, everyone in the entire town will know about you in short order. In either case, you may find life less than excessively pleasant.

2) TX is a RED state. You won't find life pleasant here if you decide to lecture us on politics or whine about same. Yes, it's true, and probably not exactly an eye-opener that we and a lot of other states don't particularly relish the idea of an influx of liberals — most will assume that if you're from CA, you're a liberal (you can call yourself a progressive or spin it however you like, it won't matter, you are the opposite of us and you will likely be alienated). If you're a self-absorbed, self-centered snowflake, you will HATE living in TX. If you don't like guns, you will absolutely HATE living in Texas, guaranteed.

3) It can indeed get pretty damn hot and humid here (coastal areas at least). It may take a while for outsiders to acclimate and to learn not to fear (or at least learn how to deal with) hurricanes and flooding. It floods in south TX often, even sans hurricane, as we get lots and lots and lots of rain here. Of course, the farther north you go, the less you need worry about the big storms.
TX also has deserts, so you can stay really dry (and hot) if you want to. :grin2:

4) Not sure where you were thinking about in TX, or where your work would take you, but my area is chemical city. I live a hop and a skip from numerous major oil refineries and chemical plants. It's our industry, it's what we do. Other parts of TX, not so much — well, Dallas is a big oil town, of course. It can get odoriferous here at times, but nothing like it was decades ago. There's still always the potential for explosions and/or leaks or other accidents which can force mass evacuation. That doesn't happen often. The pollution isn't really that bad since the industry was made to clean up its act decades ago, and it's not usually very smoggy in Houston. There's a much worse smog problem in certain parts of CA.

Mountains? We have a few: https://vacationidea.com/texas/most-beautiful-mountains-in-texas.html
It's pretty flat where I am, but not far from here, on up around San Antonio, it gets very hilly and rocky.
 

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It totally depends on where in TX you live. The weather is DAMN hot in the summer in South/Central TX, but cold and snowy in the Panhandle and up near Amarillo and it even snows sometimes in Dallas.

Dallas is kinda snooty, but most Texans are GENUINELY friendly, generous, hospitable human beings. DO NOT expect Californication liberalism to fly here AT ALL.

TX has the lowest unemployment in the U.S, and if you're in Tech, you've got it made. Also goes for working in the trades...a good tradesman will find lotsa work.

Lotta rivers, lakes and fun places to go and explore throughout the state, and great fishing in the Gulf. There is everything from mountains in West TX to deserts and coastal plains. If that ain't enough, well....

All that said, stay the hell outa Austin...it's already too crowded because of Californicators moving here and trying to re-create the People's Republic of CA.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Southern hospitality IS a real thing. You don't need tow trucks in Texas if you go off the road. Wait a little bit and two guys in a pickup will come by soon with a tow rope and get you out. They live for this.
This is promising. You don't see much of that here in SoCal. Then again, there isn't much "off the road" over here in SoCal either unless you live up the mountains or in the desert. And then, you would have people in a pickup come help you out with a rope.


You'll eat better than you have anywhere else in the country. People really are genuinely friendly overall. Yes, some people come off as douches over the web, but don't worry about that. There are douches everywhere, they're always going to show up in groups.
What do you mean, "you'll eat better than you have anywhere else in the country"? Like, I know TX is big on steak and whatnot, but what do you really mean?

Taxes are MUCH better in Texas.
This is where I'm concerned at. In that FB group I'm on I mentioned in my OP, people keep on raving about there being no income tax and low vehicle registration fees. However, when they mention property taxes, they seem to be at 2.2% (average) and that percentage rate changes from county to county. Basically, it comes down to whatever I'm saving on vehicle registration and other taxes here in CA I'd be spending it on property taxes. Furthermore, since TX doesn't have anything similar to CA's Prop 13, the dollar amount of the property tax bill will fluctuate yearly as the property's value is reassessed yearly. Here in CA, because of Prop 13, my tax bill remains tied to the value of my house as to when I bought (or refinanced) my house. So even if my house is valued at $350k but I bought it at $185k, I'm only paying property taxes on $185k and not $350k. That to me is my top two reasons for not leaving CA.

Freedoms are much better if you happen to be a gun owner/enthusiast. The weather is hotter than CA, but everywhere is Air Conditioned.
I don't care either way about 2A freedoms. I think that firearms are cool, but not a necessity or enthusiast about them.

Not 100% sure where Redfin is, but Houston is flat as a pancake, as is Dallas/Ft Worth. Austin is the hilly area, I think there's mountains in the Panhandle/north central part of Texas but not 100% sure. If you need mountains, Colorado is right there.
Redfin isn't a city, it's a website.

Define "mountains" for TX. The nearest mountain to me you go up 1-1/4 mile in elevation in under 20 miles of road.

Colorado is a state I'd consider, except it snows. I don't want a snow state, mainly because of rust. I don't want to deal with anything that living in a snow state requires.

Portions of Texas are hilly; the foothills of the Ozarks head through Arkansas to Texas.

Shucks, portions of East Texas are a bit hilly; not to Arkansas levels, but then, depending on WHERE in Texas, Arkansas hills may be just 3 or 4 hours away. (Or less ... it gets hilly going northeast from Texarkana - a dual city, used to be two cities, Texarkana TX and Texarkana AR, but is now one city as it's consolidating!)
Yes, that's one of the areas that I've seen pop up in the FB group I'm a member of. Kinda weird to have a single city on two different states.

You can't "pre-approve" an area you're moving into; Do it, and THEN find good people. :)

Most people are worth a ****, but the noise from the douchebags drowns it out online. :D
I'd definitely check it out first before actually moving. Wife and I are thinking mid to late summer.

We have family out in San Antonio. It helps to have people you know where you want to go. Most of my family is still in California though.
This. I have no one out there. Well, a couple of e-friends and potentially one family friend who I haven't seen in almost 20 years....

You cant beat the weather in Ca. TX is Hot as ****. That thing about no mountains really weirded me out when I went to visit … I live in the valley surrounded by mountains - so it was a huge shock to me. But like you said .. drive 30 minutes Southwest and im in Santa Cruz beach. Drive about 4 hours north, and I can go to the snow in Lake Tahoe. Five hours south and im in Disneyland.
This.

For me, a "long drive" to get fast food is like 10 minutes away. Over there, it might be an hour drive if you want something in the next town over.
That's what I'm seeing. Unless you live in one of the big metroplex areas such as DFW, Houston, and San Antonio, everything will be "out there".

The pay / job situation is a huge factor. Over there my fellow tradesmen make half of what I make - so they travel here to make the big money. But cost of living is lower in some cases. Its just that you get a lot more for what you pay for over there, if you can pay for it.
That is definitely a huge factor I touched on up above on this post. I work in IT and am trying to get into project management (some experience, but "not enough") and I'm finding wages for what I do everywhere from $45k/yr up to $85k/yr and I'm right in that range myself now here in CA. The argument I'm seeing frequently of "you get more for your money" may be true, but if I'm still paying roughly the same at the end of the day due to higher property taxes, is it really worth it from a financial perspective? Yea, I'd be paying just a small fraction in vehicle registration fees out in TX compared to what I pay for here in CA, but those property taxes are THOUSANDS of dollars more in TX than what I pay for here in CA. Here in CA, I only pay $2,200/yr in property taxes.

One thing I have heard ,if you’re coming from California leave your politics behind . They DO NOT like that here . Hear that all the time .
Yes, that is a common theme I quickly found out in that FB group I'm in.

I've lived in the Houston area all my life, so I can answer most questions about this particular part of TX.

I won't go into the various positive aspects of life here, because the OP reads more like a travel brochure. The thread seems rather pointless, as you're clearly enthralled with Cali life and want to stay put, and are essentially looking for excuses to NOT move to TX.
I'm not necessarily enthralled with life here in CA. I'm just looking at it from a financial perspective and I don't seem to have any net benefit.

1) Most people in any given part of TX won't take kindly to snobbery and yammering on about the superiority and glory of CA. We are generally hospitable, but that **** will get you snubbed and/or flamed jiffy quick. Word spreads quickly, too, and everyone in the neighborhood will know about you in short order — if it's a small town, everyone in the entire town will know about you in short order. In either case, you may find life less than excessively pleasant.
I keep my politics close to my chest. I have my opinions and views but I try not to enter conversation about it except with close friends and family. Even then, I limit my conversation. My conversation with politics is always at the ballot box!

2) TX is a RED state. You won't find life pleasant here if you decide to lecture us on politics or whine about same. Yes, it's true, and probably not exactly an eye-opener that we and a lot of other states don't particularly relish the idea of an influx of liberals — most will assume that if you're from CA, you're a liberal (you can call yourself a progressive or spin it however you like, it won't matter, you are the opposite of us and you will likely be alienated). If you're a self-absorbed, self-centered snowflake, you will HATE living in TX. If you don't like guns, you will absolutely HATE living in Texas, guaranteed.
Again, I don't speak politics. All I'll say is that I'm a "purple" and I'll leave it at that.

3) It can indeed get pretty damn hot and humid here (coastal areas at least). It may take a while for outsiders to acclimate and to learn not to fear (or at least learn how to deal with) hurricanes and flooding. It floods in south TX often, even sans hurricane, as we get lots and lots and lots of rain here. Of course, the farther north you go, the less you need worry about the big storms.

TX also has deserts, so you can stay really dry (and hot) if you want to. :grin2:
I hate humidity. Probably because there's so little of it here in SoCal. There are maybe 30 days total throughout the year here in SoCal where the humidity is unbearable. If you have to live with it day in and day out, I'm not sure if I could deal. But like you said, we have to acclimate. How long would that take for me though? Only I'll find out.

Hurricanes and flooding. That's a whole different animal to deal with. I'm not sure what to even do there. And those are every few years.

Deserts. That's West TX such as El Paso area, right?

4) Not sure where you were thinking about in TX, or where your work would take you, but my area is chemical city. I live a hop and a skip from numerous major oil refineries and chemical plants. It's our industry, it's what we do. Other parts of TX, not so much — well, Dallas is a big oil town, of course. It can get odoriferous here at times, but nothing like it was decades ago. There's still always the potential for explosions and/or leaks or other accidents which can force mass evacuation. That doesn't happen often. The pollution isn't really that bad since the industry was made to clean up its act decades ago, and it's not usually very smoggy in Houston. There's a much worse smog problem in certain parts of CA.
I'm thinking the DFW area of TX, if we end up going. Apparently from that FB group I'm a member of, so are like 75% of the other California "refugees" are also thinking going there.

Mountains? We have a few: https://vacationidea.com/texas/most-beautiful-mountains-in-texas.html
It's pretty flat where I am, but not far from here, on up around San Antonio, it gets very hilly and rocky.
Those aren't mountains. Those are cute little hills! :rofl: I want mountains to do some canyon carving in the T-Bird!









This is the front of Highway 243. I live literally 5 minutes from the bottom of this where the video starts off at.


This is Highway 18 and 330 which take you into Big Bear. The bottom of the mountain is just 15min from where I live.


This is GMR. This is NOT a friendly one. Many have eaten **** here, myself included. It's where I totaled my RX-8 back in 2006. The East side of this is 30min from where I live. The West side of GMR is the harder part where people eat it here.

 

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Pretty much anywhere in the southeast is 90+% humidity most of the year; it's just something we deal with. (I'm in TN)

Schools suck here; they took all the funding years ago, in the Regan era, so I'd keep that in mind if you have kids, as Private school is almost required if you want educated kids, and that can be 50k a year. I hear that's most places in the country now, so ymmv.
On the good side, Everyone here gets 2 years of free college, that usually covers the remedial classes.

Property taxes here change every 4 years, and are pretty low, and we have lots of waterfront property.

There's no state inspection of cars, (except memphis, iirc), and registration is ~$25.

There's no income tax, and all counties have legal alcohol here now. :)
 

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Come on down brother, life is great here. Sure it’s hot as **** but who cares. We could all use a little weight loss around the mid section anyway lol I’m in Frisco which is the outskirts of DFW. people are generally nice here but the D bags live among us for sure🙄. So come on down... enjoy some moonshine and whiskey at your local bar. Open carry is legit most cowboys are packing .357 revolvers lol but it’s all good we mean no harm. Lol so head on over you'll be thanking me later. We having a saying here: I may not have grown up in Texas but I got here as quick as I could. Another point, we have our own oil refineries, sea ports, and power grid. So if need be we can separate from the union lol🤠
 

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Regarding hurricanes and flooding, if the area you move to doesn't have flood insurance available, don't move there. Pick places that are higher than others, with drainage. Invest in those water stops if you can't.
 

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I grew up in Austin, went to college at UT Austin, and worked after college in both the DFW and Houston metro areas. I moved to the SF Bay Area in 2004 and honestly, I probably will never move back.

Austin
Austin would be by far my first choice for living in TX.
- Pros:
* The culture is much more left leaning than the rest of Texas and while religion is a big thing in TX, it's not nearly as all encompassing like you see in the other areas.
* Thanks to the university and the tech sector, there are non-hispanic and non-black minorities so ethnic food is available beyond southern comfort, cajun cuisine, and tex-mex. It "punches above its weight" but it's nothing compared to the Bay Area (or even Houston).

- CONS:
* Housing, esp in the center part of town, is cheaper than the Bay Area but probably won't save you much compared to SoCal. Californians have distorted the market. They haven't built a new highway since i was a kid. What used to take 15 min to cross town can now take 1.5 hours thanks to the influx of 1-1.5M more people in the metro area. This part is simply awful.

* There are lakes in the area (which are nice) but this does add to the humidity when it gets hot. THIS is the main reason why I wouldn't move back to TX if I can afford to live in SF. You spend 10 months out of the year indoor under A/C

* There are roads through the hills (esp west of austin) that people take to with their cars. I knew some friends of friends who lunched a few cars this way.

* ******* mosquitos.

Dallas/DFW
I worked in the Plano area for 2 years after college.
* Life is much more suburban here which for some, suits people just fine. Big churches, big hair, big trucks, chain stores & restaurants as far as the eye can see.
* There are clusters of asians in certain cities so you can get decent dim sum and other asian food. In general, it's
chinese or vietnamese with a smattering of others. You won't get the find divisions of the bay area (malaysian, burmese, cambodian, thai, Xianjiang , shanghai-ese, taiwanese, sichuan, japanese (beyond sushi and teppenyaki)... I could go on and on.
* Good Hwy infrastructure. IIRC, it was all about high speed runs and drag racing (at least 18 years ago) b/c of the infrastructure and there is a road course there that Lemons races at (Eagles Canyon).
* People tend to be more closeminded if you don't look/act like them. Not nearly as welcoming a city.
* Weather is slightly nicer in DFW but it can get colder since there's nothing to stop the cold from the plains. The heat is a little more tolerable though b/c it tends to be drier air

Houston
* I also lived here for 2 years. Also, cheap housing.
* Weather is pretty awful. Besides the sweltering heat w/ 100% humidity, you also get crazy thunderstorms/flooding and ******* mosquitos.
* People tend to be nicer here (more minorities all over the place so
* more of the same surburbia. Between my apt and my office was a 10mi commute and I think you passed 3 walmarts and 2 targets.
* At least in houston itself, there's no such thing as zoning. Right next to my apartment complex was a high school, a giant ass billboard, a church, a Sonic Drive in, and an adult movie store. Crazy.
* Also, lots of Hwy infrastructure.
* I actually have a friend moving back to Houston with his kid despite him telling me that will never happen. If you squint your eyes, the central part of houston can be kind of nice and ditto with the upper middle class "The Woodlands" community. You give up a little more culture but you gain a much cheaper place to raise your kids, decent schools (at least in the burbs), etc.

El Paso
* I've hung out with some friends from el paso on my way through there the few times I drove through (3 or 4). Tex mex is good there but that's to be expected. The rest of the town just reminds me of medium town america.

* Probably similar to some parts of SoCal/AZ/NM where hispanic folks/culture/cuisine is the dominant "ethnic" feature.

* I remember most of my friends saying it was pretty crappy to grow up there although most of them spent their HS nights partying across the border in Juarez. Of the ones that survived to come to college with me, they tended to be the more level headed kids freshman year b/c they got their partying done in HS.

* I'm not sure that's where I'd want to raise my kids. I'd probably say the same for most of the other smaller cities in TX (Abeline, Corpus Christie, Laredo, Waco, etc.)


Some smaller towns might be nice (San Marcos or New Braunfuls -- because of the river) but I'm not sure what you'd do there for an income. IIRC, you do IT so you might have it easier since your job is more portable. The downside is even if you found one job, the next job might be harder to come by in a smaller community.

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It might not hurt to send out a few resumes and see if you can snag an interview in some of these places. If they will fly you out, it might be worth seeing if it's a place you want to visit. If you can't get someone to fly you out on their dime, perhaps you can plan a vacation out there to see if these towns are some place you'd like to settle in.

If you like mountains, consider CO (which isn't as cheap as TX but still cheaper than the Bay Area) -- both Denver and in the Mtns (like in Eagle, for example). Might be on par with some parts of SoCal. Or New Mexico. I'd consider both if I had a more portable job.
-g
 

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I grew up in Austin, went to college at UT Austin, and worked after college in both the DFW and Houston metro areas. I moved to the SF Bay Area in 2004 and honestly, I probably will never move back.

If you like mountains, consider CO (which isn't as cheap as TX but still cheaper than the Bay Area) -- both Denver and in the Mtns (like in Eagle, for example). Might be on par with some parts of SoCal. Or New Mexico. I'd consider both if I had a more portable job.
-g
It really is hard to go anywhere else after living in the Bay area. If you have a good paying job, no reason to leave = this is why I am still here. So-Cal really is night and day difference to Nor-cal. I just got back from a trip to Los Angeles this weekend, those people drive like crazy on the freeway.

We were looking into Colorado at some point. Seemed like a reasonable place, decent schools and housing prices were OK. ( I don't plan to work if I move to TX or CO, Retirement for what its worth )

**** New Mexico .. that place is a **** hole.
 

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Austin is a small "Californian" town,The main place the transplants flock too. Reason locals are moving away from it.
 

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California, surfing in the morning and snow skiing in the afternoon.

Texas, thank you for refining the oil and being a great buffer.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
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It might not hurt to send out a few resumes and see if you can snag an interview in some of these places. If they will fly you out, it might be worth seeing if it's a place you want to visit. If you can't get someone to fly you out on their dime, perhaps you can plan a vacation out there to see if these towns are some place you'd like to settle in.

If you like mountains, consider CO (which isn't as cheap as TX but still cheaper than the Bay Area) -- both Denver and in the Mtns (like in Eagle, for example). Might be on par with some parts of SoCal. Or New Mexico. I'd consider both if I had a more portable job.
-g
I've already seen some job postings and have considered sending it out but haven't done it. A big reason why is because I'd like to use a TX address but I don't have anyone I know in TX....well, aside from peeps here on TCCoA. One person here has already offered to let me use their address and I may take them up on that offer.

The wife mentioned CO, UT, and ID but all those states have something in common that I'm not entirely down for. SNOW! I don't want to deal with annual snowfall and all of its downsides. Yea, it's pretty and fun to play in but I like having the option here in SoCal of just going to snow whenever I want to in the winter. Also, rust. My DD is 19yrs old and has 337k miles on the clock. How many cars where it snows are that old with no rust?

It really is hard to go anywhere else after living in the Bay area. If you have a good paying job, no reason to leave = this is why I am still here. So-Cal really is night and day difference to Nor-cal. I just got back from a trip to Los Angeles this weekend, those people drive like crazy on the freeway.

We were looking into Colorado at some point. Seemed like a reasonable place, decent schools and housing prices were OK. ( I don't plan to work if I move to TX or CO, Retirement for what its worth )

**** New Mexico .. that place is a **** hole.
For me, the incentive of leaving CA isn't political reasoning but rather financial. After having been part of that FB group and reading the stories of how much people pay in property taxes (ranging from $5,500/yr to $8,000/yr) the savings financially, despite not being "taxed to death" here in CA, the only net benefit I'm finding is having a bigger home. In my particular financial situation, even making more money out there, I wouldn't be necessarily saving much money, if any. I'd be breaking even.

Austin is a small "Californian" town,The main place the transplants flock too. Reason locals are moving away from it.
In that FB group I'm on, it seems that there are more people moving to the DFW area than other parts of TX. At least that's what I'm observing.
 
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