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i'm goin' with a weld, i've already got the rears and personally i think too many of the options for our stock bolt pattern are gaudy or to ricerlike. so pretty much i just need the stock bs in inches so i can order the fronts.
 

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coggonobrien said:
i'm goin' with a weld, i've already got the rears and personally i think too many of the options for our stock bolt pattern are gaudy or to ricerlike. so pretty much i just need the stock bs in inches so i can order the fronts.
I hope you bought your Weld's after this post, or at least got a line on some used ones. Weld Wheels filed for bankrupcy this past August. I think "American Racing" might have bought them out since, but I'm not 100%.
 

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How does the Lincoln LS wheels work on an MN-12?
 

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Chrome is a plating. The wheels are still the same. Yes they do cost more, but if they were pure chrome they'd cost millions each.

You have to go to a shop to get tires mounted anyway. nothing special about chrome wheels. Most shops charge more to mount tires on chrome wheels because if they mess up, it costs them alot more than if it was a painted wheel.

How tire sizes work:

stock: 215/70-15

215: section width; how wide the tire is at it's widest point. Tread width can vary by model.

70: a percentage based on the section width. 70 would be 70%, and the sidewall would be 70% as tall as the tire is wide.

15: this is the wheel size in diameter.

You can change the section width and percentage to get better performance in different conditions, but the wheel diameter MUST match.

So for summer, you could run a 245/60-15 on the stock wheels, and you'd have more traction. In winter (if in snow region), you could use a 205/75-15 for better traction.
I have a set of 205/75/15 on my stock fanblades, I was thinking of getting some 235/60/15 on them this winter. From what you said here it seems I'd be better off with the 205s this winter? Or would the 235s be better?
 

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Thinner is better for winter. Thinner tires will have an easier time cutting through the snow and maintaining contact with the road. While wider tires will tend to go over it, riding on the snow, rather than through it.

A dedicated winter tire will be worth its weight in gold.
 

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Wow, I never thought of it that way. Thanks for the tip, I suppose I won't be buying new tires quite yet then, since these will do perfectly.
 

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cobra rims

just got a set of chrome cobras, now time for the brake upgrade and hub swap, need to know if that guy is still making those brakets for rear calipers
 

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Actually, backspace and offset are different ways to measure pretty much the same thing. Backspace is the distance from the inside of the mounting hub to the inside of the wheel. Essentially, it's the space that hangs back into the wheel well. Offset is the distance that the mounting surface is offset from the centerline of the width of the wheel.

For instance, a 17x8" wheel with a backspace of 4" will have an offset of 0, since the mounting surface is right on the centerline. If it has a backspace of 5" it will have an offset of 1". If it has a backspace of 3", it will have an offset of -1" (negative offset wheel). As you can see, offset is a useless measurement without knowing the width of the wheel. Backspacing can tell you at least how much the wheel will protrude into the wheel well.

Here's a picture that explains it better.

I am abit confused here. this says to measure with a straight edge from the OUTSIDE lip of the rim, is it not from the INSIDe of the lip of the rim? I am test fitting a set of 20x8.5 Foose wheels and need to be precise on the backspacing & offset. Thanks in advance, JPT.
 

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And a word about Aluminum, or Polished Aluminum .... I live in Va. We have rain, snow, salty roads, sun, etc .... I currently have polished aluminum wheels on both my '85 and my '92 Thunderbirds, I've had polished aluminum on other vehicles. I also have had a Norton and two Triumphs with great deals of polished aluminum exposed.

I prefer polished aluminum with NO clear coatings. I can simply touch up a polish with Hipatchie SemiChrome once every year and simply wash the wheel with mild soapy water as I wash the car between and they look great. I never use a wheel cleaner on polished aluminum, I've never found one that doesn't spot unless used exactly "just so so" (and even then it's a crap shoot) .... and it's easier to just use soap. I apply protective coatings of SemiChrome or other good grade car wax in between.

Some clear coats can peal, get chips ... and then you have some surface uncoated, some coated, and the two never look the same, it looks like crap. A good factory applied clear coating will last for years (I have two Honda GoldWings, they both have some polished aluminum that's protected by a factory coating on the motors, it's good. I also have some uncoated polished aluminum parts on them, it's not hard to repolish once in a year or two), but when it starts chipping or pealing .... it's time to clean it all off and either recoat, or polish.

Anodized aluminum is a different deal.

(ps .... Mother's Aluminum Polish is great too!)

I polished these 10 spokes in 1997, I've maybe touched them uo once a year at most, took 20 minutes total to polish touch up with a smidgen of Mother's and a wrag the other day.
 

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So are all T Bird wheels interchangeable between 89- 97?
Is there anything to watch out for?

My situation is this; I have a newly acquired 96 LX Bird, the tires on it are worthless. Most likely will be buying some dedicated winter tires for them.
Will a set of 16" rims from a 97 bolt right up to my 96. What about a set of 15" alloy wheels from my 92 Bird? What about my stock steel rims from my 89 Bird?
I guess what I'm asking is will any stock T Bird wheel bolt up to any T Bird? Or did they change backspace and offset over the years where it would make certain years not bolt up.
In the end I want a set of winter wheels weather they be on my old steel wheels or my 92 alloys .
I can then use my 96 alloys for summer tires.
Or if the deal is sweet enough I will be buying a set of 97 16" rims for summer use and I'll use my 96 alloys for winter.
Soon my 89 and 92 will be going away and I need to know what to save back if any.
Confused yet? sorry so am I.
I'm interested in trading for the tires needed winter or all season, but only if they are Blizzaks or firehawks. Sorry for being picky but those are the 2 best tires I have run over the last 9 years of owning a Bird for this area.
If anyone local wants to buy up a couple of cars cheap then come see me. The 89 (3.8)is, or was a daily driver until last month when I got the 96. The 92 has a blown 3.8 motor and tranny, bought that way and never touchd it except removing the alloys for my 89, but is still titled. I would consider both parts cars with good titles but both can be put back on the road with a little work. Both are in Northern KY area, spare hood $600 for all . email is [email protected](dot)com. I also have some new parts for rear brakes on the 89.
I need tires very soon and need the cash for them.
 

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I am abit confused here. this says to measure with a straight edge from the OUTSIDE lip of the rim, is it not from the INSIDe of the lip of the rim? I am test fitting a set of 20x8.5 Foose wheels and need to be precise on the backspacing & offset. Thanks in advance, JPT.

http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/5337/apr1200021bq2.th.jpg
In the example cited in the diagram, say it's a 7" wide wheel, say out side to outside measurement is 8 inches, center will always be center. It's halfway between the edges. Offset is a measurement expressed in mm (metric) and reflects the difference between this imaginary center line, and the mounting face of the wheel that sets against the brake rotor or drum.

Zero offset means they are the same.

Positive offset means the center of the rim is offset in-ward from the mounting surface, or that the mounting surface is towards the outside of the wheel. Like a front wheel drive car.

Negative offset means the center of the rim is offset out-ward from the mounting surface, or that the mounting surface is towards the inside of the wheel. Like the deep dish Cragars I had on my '65 GTO back in the day.

If you know the offset, and whether it's negative or positive, you can measure in / out from the mounting surface of your brake drum / rotor where the wheel sets and that is where the center of the wheel will be. If it's a 15 X 7 or a 16 X 8 wheel, the center will be .... the center of that rim width measurement.

The reason they used the out side to outside lip method is simple, it's easier placing a ruler / straightedge across a wheel's outer lip when it's setting on a flat surface, measure down to the flat surface and splitting that figure (say it's 8 inches, half is 4", thus 4" from the flat surface is the center whether measuring out to out or in to in). Then while the wheel is still lying on that flat surface, or by flipping it over and using a straight edge, measure from mounting surface to one of the same lips (say it's 3" from mounting surface to inside lip, you have 1" negative offset, or 25.4 mm negative offset when converted to metric).

Most wheels have the same size lips on both sides, but it's just easier measuring out side lips when dealing with measuring down through a center.

About "backspace", that is the way it used to always be done before metrics and all these front wheel drive cars and such. Properly, it does refer to the difference between the tire mounting surface of the inner lip and the wheel's mounting surface, not outer edge of inner lip as depicted. It can easily be 1/2 - 3/4" difference depending on the wheel. To do it correctly, I would measuer as shown, then measure the width of that inner lip back to tire bead surface and subtract that. A 15X 7 wheel with 3 " back space is telling me that 4" of that wheel's tire bead mounting width is outside towards the viewer and away from the brake drum / rotor.

Your T-Bird's wheels will almost always have positive offset, or else stick way outside the fenders.

Also, watch that front upper control arm @ ball joint & and ball joint stud sticking down.


:)
 

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15 X 7

Hello

I you are going to use 15 X 7's your back spack will be more than 5 1/4"

Thats what mine are. They came from a Ranger or Explorer.
I need steel wheels. I have a set from a Ranger, Same ring size.
However different bolt pattern. They are 4 1/2in bolt pattern.
They do stick out more do to the wider. 7 VS 6.5


Paul
 

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so on my 90 Tbird SC....how wide i can go? currently i have 225/60/16....i jus want to increase the section width to like 245....if anyone has done it before can u guys let me know wats the maximum and safest limit i can go for on stocks....thank you:)
 

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wheel offset

a 17x8 wheel is actually 9"" wide because wheel backspacing goes to the outside
edge so a 17x8 wheel with a 4" backspace is actually 1/2" negative - tire guys
measure wheels inside to inside whereas wheel guys measure from outside to
outside hence the confusion - you also need to convert to millimeters because
wheelo mfgs post their specs in mm example: 17x9 wheel w/26mm offset =
6" backspace - as far as polished/chrome/powdercoated wheel upkeep
wax your wheels to seal them just like your paint! "
NEVERDULL IS TOO ABRASIVE!!! you would never use rubbibg compound on new
clearcoated paint, wheels are no different! too many guys put new wheels on and
figure there is some magical spray on hose off cleaners for upkeep - not true
the softest thing i have found is VIVA paper towels - even softer than baby diapers - keep a roll in your trunk for drying wheels
 

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Very true and a very good post. Good job!
 
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