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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a new starter relay in my attempt to track down my intermittent no-crank problem. I have looked through my service manual, and it does not say where the relay is located, all it says is what it does, brief description. I asked the local ford dealer where it is, they couldn't even tell me. The one thing I was told was "follow the positive battery cable" Also, in one part of my service manual, the starter relay I am trying to find, is shown, hooked up to the positive battery cable. I have followed it as far as I can see, and I can't find the starter relay.

Anybody know?

thanks.
 

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It is better known as a starter solenoid. It is attached to the starter. It is the small cylindrical part that all the wires go to on the starter. You can bypass it and use a universal one if you want but you would have to re-route all the wires. It is easiest just to buy a new starter.
 

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It is better known as a starter solenoid. It is attached to the starter. It is the small cylindrical part that all the wires go to on the starter. You can bypass it and use a universal one if you want but you would have to re-route all the wires. It is easiest just to buy a new starter.
You can't bypass the solenoid. It shoots the drive gear out when activated so that it engages the flywheel/flexplate.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oh right okay...I was thinking that there was a starter relay IN ADDITION to the starter solenoid...ford dealer said there was and ended up selling me a non 4.6 starter solenoid.

Moisture is casing my intermittent no crank problem, and I am still trying to track down what is causing it...replaced the starter and solenoid with a brand new one, replaced the ignition switch under the column with a brand new one, replaced the alternator with a brand new one, although the alternator was a problem unrelated to the no crank issue, just a coincidence.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
the MLPS is also known as the Neutral Safety Switch, correct?

If I buy a new transmission from one of the usual vendors that people like to go through around here, won't it come with a new MLPS already installed?

thanks

Earl
 

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If you have the alarm option, there's a relay in the dash in the loop to the starter.

It's mounted just under the top of the dash, driver's side, from the evtm...
 

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Wow, where mine used to have a spade, the newer starter I installed has a bolt. What I did was looped a metal Clothes hanger around the bolt and stuck the straight end of the coat hanger inside the female spade slot. Works for the time being until I can get one of these -
 

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Wow, where mine used to have a spade, the newer starter I installed has a bolt....
The spade terminal connection at the starter has been a big problem. The newer starters have a bolt connection. Many also come with a short length of wire to retrofit the old spade end to that ring terminal. I'd suggest you buy a ring terminal end with the proper wire size crimp end on it, and cut and attach it to your OEM wire.



I'm also hunting an odd starting issue in my 91 LSC. My first guess has been the battery cable, as cleaning the battery terminal helps, but not completely. I'm thinking that the starter wiring may also be part of the problem.

Ever since Ford began connecting the battery to the starter, more and more starting issues occur. I never had any trouble with any older Fords, it was either the starter or the fender mounted starter solenoid, never wires or under car connections. Lincolns are heavy in electrical stuff, but they always have been. I and friends used to make fun of GM guys, because of the stupid place GM put their starter solenoid. Now we have to bite our tongues, Ford has done it now also.
 

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My first guess has been the battery cable, as cleaning the battery terminal helps, but not completely.
I think if you check, it isn't the terminal cleaning that makes it better for a few cranks, it's the battery wire itself moving around.

The cables are known to rust up under the jacket, making the cable high resistance.

Wiggling the wire around will make the rusted pieces weld together somewhat, and work for a bit. As it gets worse, it just won't work one day when you beat on the cable. :)

When it's not working, measure the voltage at the big terminal on the starter, as someone tries to crank it. If the wire is rusting out, you will see big voltage drops at the starter, and it won't turn. Usually the big terminal will show good voltage on a voltmeter until you hit the starter. :D

It will drop some, when it tries to start with a good battery and cables; but lower than 8 volts, and the starter won't work.

Cutting a bad wire open will show a bunch of green power; sometimes you can get it to come out the end of the cable...

Same goes for the starter solenoid wire, but it's rarer, because it doesn't have power on it all the time.
 
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