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Discussion Starter #1
Is this something that I dare try or pay someone to do it?

Story: I have a '95 rolling chasis junker that I have yanked the leather interior, pulled the doors, deck lid, hood, some wiring, abs, etc. to install on my daily driver (once I get a chance to park it for a week or two). My daily driver has a bull's eye in the front glass and awful-bubling tint on the rear glass. The junker has nice clean glass. However, I need to finish yanking stuff to get the junker off the property this weekend.

I have neve dealt with glass on the "newer" type of cars. My experience is with aircooled VWs, 1930s Fords, and 1960s Fords. They just had a gasket that went around the window, cut the gasket, and pull window. How do I go about "cutting" the sealant without breaking the glass? Will a putty knife/spatchula do the trick? I just want to remove the glass for now and pay someone to install it later.
 

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My recommendation is to have someone do it for you, unless you have the proper tools for the removal.

I was informed by the guy that did my glass removal that the windshields of our cars are notorious for breaking as mine did. The back glass however, is much more robust as it has more curve to it and is therefore more hardy.

I think I paid the guy $60 to have both pieces removed, but my front glass was already cracked.
 

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I had one of those mobile glass places replace the windshield on my Town Car. He used some tool that was kind of like a right angle knife the went behind the glass and cut the seal. He broke it getting it out, but it was already broken.
As far as the back I think it would be easier to just remove the tint..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I finally found someone that will R&R the windows. He said he will do it for $120 (windshield , quarters, and rear window). Sounds kind of cheap to me....but then again, I did remove the quarter windows for him already. :D What is a good product to remove the goop (seal) on the quarter windows?

I will go ahead and drill the rivets for the windshield trim on the parts car when I get home tomorrow since I am working late today....Saturday morning I will yank the interior trim in my daily driver and quarters.

ANOTHER QUESTION: When I drill out the rivets, do the butts fall down and just rattle around in the pillar or is there an exit point for the bits and pieces???

Anybody need any quarter windows? How about a rear window with crappy tint? Winshield with a small chip in it? Price is right, freeeee. You need to pick them up though....
 

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Here's a trick for getting that window dumdum out from around the quarter window area.. works a bit better when it's not so cold. Grab a bit of it and ball it up.. use the ball and tack it on what's left on the car.. the ball should pull it right off almost perfectly clean. This mess will get alllll over your fingers too.. what was left I used laquer thinner to clean up with.
 

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Mark33563 said:
Is this something that I dare try or pay someone to do it?

Story: I have a '95 rolling chasis junker that I have yanked the leather interior, pulled the doors, deck lid, hood, some wiring, abs, etc. to install on my daily driver (once I get a chance to park it for a week or two). My daily driver has a bull's eye in the front glass and awful-bubling tint on the rear glass. The junker has nice clean glass. However, I need to finish yanking stuff to get the junker off the property this weekend.

I have neve dealt with glass on the "newer" type of cars. My experience is with aircooled VWs, 1930s Fords, and 1960s Fords. They just had a gasket that went around the window, cut the gasket, and pull window. How do I go about "cutting" the sealant without breaking the glass? Will a putty knife/spatchula do the trick? I just want to remove the glass for now and pay someone to install it later.
The rear window will cut out without breaking if done properly. If the windshield is the original, they have some of toughest glue ever and will likely not come out in 1 piece. If it was replaced, then maybe, but let someone who knows what they're doing attempt to take it out. Take this from an auto glass installer.
 
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